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Thread: Cilantro/Culantro

  1. #1
    Dog Whisperer cookshow's Avatar
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    Default Cilantro/Culantro

    I love Cilantro, the local Culantro is a fine substitute. When you see Culantro or Cilantro in the shops here (very seldom) it is 20 cords a bunch. On the main I pay 2-5 cords a bunch depending on the size.

    I have finally got a half dozen Culantro plants, trying to collect and sprout the seeds. I have 2 Cilantro plants growing and started some more seeds this past weekend. Cilantro has been tough, I hope I can get the 2 I have to go to seed, the seeds I have bought or been given seem to be "sleepy".

    This year my Avocado crop was shot due to salt spray burning the trees, last year I ate avocado 3 times a day for over 3 months, guacmole and plantain chips makes life so much more enjoyable. I have 8 mature or almost mature avocado trees, another 6 planted in the past few years, so I really need to get the cilantro growing figured out.
    ‎"You know what you say when people tell you you can't do something? Fool, shut your mouth up!"
    Ernie K Doe

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    Papatara mupitara's Avatar
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    Default Re: Cilantro/Culantro

    I have so much culantro and albahaca (local basil) growing that folks from the community come around daily to yank up leaves. Whe the culantro plants begin to have ripe seeds, I pull them off the plant and look for a patch of bare ground to spread them. Some germinate. Others do not. Whan albahaca turns to seed, I pull it up. It is so prolific that I don´t dare let too many drop seed. I´d be covered in the stuff!

    We take precautions to wash your herbs thoroughly before consuming them. It smells pretty strongly of albahaca and culantro when I crush the plants on the ground as I stumble outside to pee at night!

    The culantro seeds are a pretty tasty substitute for cumino as well.

    Aisabe,
    Papatara
    Papatara, S.A. - Semaforos de Montoya 3c al sur y 1/2c abajo, frente ENIMOSA, Managua, Nicaragua
    Hotel Papatara - Alamikamba, Municipio de Prinzapolka, RAAN, Nicaragua

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    Dog Whisperer cookshow's Avatar
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    Default Re: Cilantro/Culantro

    I have lots of Sweet Basil, like you I pull it up, give it away. People come by for it to put in their Rundown. Culantro grows wild here, I am getting a good stand going and working on more.

    Here they call Basil Barsley.
    ‎"You know what you say when people tell you you can't do something? Fool, shut your mouth up!"
    Ernie K Doe

  4. #4
    Papatara mupitara's Avatar
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    Default Re: Cilantro/Culantro

    Quote Originally Posted by cookshow View Post
    I have lots of Sweet Basil, like you I pull it up, give it away. People come by for it to put in their Rundown. Culantro grows wild here, I am getting a good stand going and working on more.

    Here they call Basil Barsley.
    I don´t know if what you are calling sweet basil is the same thing as folks here call albahaca. Our albahaca is really too strong in flavor to eat except shredded into tiny pieces. The flavor is pleasant. But, it isn´t that much like the basil we use in salads in the USA.

    I have planted basil seeds from USA. They grew well and were quite delicious. But, the seeds didn´t fall and resprout like the native ones. Also, I was unable to keep viable seeds for the following planting season.

    Aisabe,
    Papatara
    Papatara, S.A. - Semaforos de Montoya 3c al sur y 1/2c abajo, frente ENIMOSA, Managua, Nicaragua
    Hotel Papatara - Alamikamba, Municipio de Prinzapolka, RAAN, Nicaragua

  5. #5
    Viejo del Foro Daddy-YO's Avatar
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    Default Re: Cilantro/Culantro

    I love the spice coriander, using it frequently in Hindu recipes with cumin & tumeric. Wiki says it is cilantro, but I can't stand the taste of cilantro, which, when I find in a soup served me, will pick it out and lay the dead plant away from me on the table. Coriander is, I believe, the ground seeds. It seems I have cilantrophobia despite enjoying the seeds. I suppose it's like eating apples, the fruit, versus its leaves (Note the appropriately green barf.)

    From Wiki:
    The leaves are variously referred to as coriander leaves, Chinese parsley, cilantro (in America, from the Spanish for the plant). It should not be confused with Culantro (Eryngium foetidum) which is a close relative to coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) but has a distinctly different appearance, a much more potent volatile leaf oil[6] and a stronger smell.

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    Dog Whisperer cookshow's Avatar
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    Default Re: Cilantro/Culantro

    Poor Cilantro nobody likes it, but everyone eats it. Dozens of names and uses. Daddy-Yo, try my guacamole you will become a believer.
    ‎"You know what you say when people tell you you can't do something? Fool, shut your mouth up!"
    Ernie K Doe

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