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Thread: Ford Tri-Motor 5-AT

  1. #26
    Papatara mupitara's Avatar
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    Default Re: Ford Tri-Motor 5-AT

    Quote Originally Posted by robertharvey View Post
    Remarkable isn't it, however; old man Perez of the Hotel Perez in Puerto Cabezas was a close friend of Somoza, and wasn't that connection by road and rail built by Somoza to the Port?

    Now Waspan is still removed but more in alignment with Honduras, right across the river. I have approached close by roadway from the Honduran side, years past.

    Oft I have wondered as to why there is no ferry of crossing to Honduras at this point?
    Actually, the railroad to Puerto Cabezas ran from the pier directly west across the pine savannah to a location called Snaki where it crossed the Rio Wawa. From there, it went through a concession zone that belonged to Standard Fruit Company, then, on to cross Rio Kukalaya to a place called Liwa Takan. I don´t think that the railroad went further south.

    Sandino´s group actually attacked and burned the bridge at Snaki. Later, Sandino´s group entered Puerto Cabezas until they were forced to run from the Marines.

    It would be stretching the truth to claim that it was Somoza who built railroad lines on the atlantic coast! This work was done by Standard Fruit Company, Braggman´s Bluff Lumber Company, and later NIPCO. Somoza was more of a controller of concessions to foreign companies for personal profit!

    In the 1960s, the Nicaraguan Mosquitia lost a great piece to Honduras due to ineptness of the Somozas.
    Papatara, S.A. - Semaforos de Montoya 3c al sur y 1/2c abajo, frente ENIMOSA, Managua, Nicaragua
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  2. #27
    Para aquí para acá Jonh's Avatar
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    Default Re: Ford Tri-Motor 5-AT

    Quote Originally Posted by mupitara View Post
    Actually, the Ford Trimotor (15 passengers) was one of the most respected passenger and cargo carriers of its time. Later, the DC-3 (21-28 passengers) and eventually the much larger CW-20 (62 passengers)(used by LANICA) became the plane of choice for passengers and cargo in our region.

    It should be remembered that until 1978 neither El Triangulo Minero, Puerto Cabezas, nor Waspam were connected to Managua (nor the rest of the world for that matter)!
    The Curtiss-Wright model 20 must be the C-46. When it came out, it was the world's largest airplane.

  3. #28
    Papatara mupitara's Avatar
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    Default Re: Ford Tri-Motor 5-AT

    Quote Originally Posted by robertharvey View Post
    There were plans to extend the network to the Atlantic coast. A contract was signed in 1903. The line should have stretched 288 km from San Miguelito (a port at Lake Nicaragua) through a difficult terrain to Monkey Point at the Caribbean coast. In 1909, after constructing about 10 miles/16.1 km of tracks, the works stopped and never resumed again. Nicaraguan railroads never connected both coasts. Private investors later built an isolated 62 miles/100 km-long standard gauge line between Puerto Cabezas and Cocoland. It operated from 1925 until 1955 and was used mainly for a transport of lumber and bananas.[3]

    This was the connection or one of them between the Somaza and Perez. Perez had a timber and lumber operation from Puerto Cabezas.

    Cocoland, mentioned above, is between Waspan and Puerto Cabezas.
    Cocoland was the name used for what today is called Buenos Aires (near Kuiguitigni) on the highway to Waspam. There was also a turnoff at Switch Moss which crossed Rio Wawa at Snaki (a rocky and shallow rapids across the river). I understand that the steel base for the bridge can still be seen there. For years, the highway engineers have tried to convince the RAAN government to relocate the present highway to this route rather than the flood prone Wawa Boom Ferry crossing. The RAAN government, and, especially YATAMA won´t agree because they get the proceeds from the ferry!

    The real power in the lumber business was NIPCO (Nicaraguan Longleaf Pine Company) which was owned by Robinson Lumber Company, New Orleans, LA). There were many small lumber operations, but, most sold to NIPCO.
    Papatara, S.A. - Semaforos de Montoya 3c al sur y 1/2c abajo, frente ENIMOSA, Managua, Nicaragua
    Hotel Papatara - Alamikamba, Municipio de Prinzapolka, RAAN, Nicaragua

  4. #29
    House SOB Little Corn Tom's Avatar
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    Default Re: Ford Tri-Motor 5-AT

    I remember soon after hooking up with Maria, I got interested in the DAC and the Corn Islands.

    While planning our first trip together to Nicaragua, I mentioned driving to Bluefields and she said "no can do". I said "huh"? In the USA if a town exists, you can drive to it.

    She said this ain't the USA.

    Then I wanted to drive to San Carlos .... "maybe can do but not me".

    Anyway I soon figured out that flying to both places was the only sensible thing to do ... so I did.

    Then later while eating goat and drinking FDC at a beach house at Laguna Apoyo .. I mentioned to some expats who lived in Miami that I went to San Carlos and they basically said that they always wanted to do that but did not have the balls...go figure..

    Sometimes ya just gotta go do it....

    Too much information only slows ya down.
    Life's different here ... It's a whole 'nother pace.

  5. #30
    Viejo del Foro Just Plain John Wayne's Avatar
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    Default Re: Ford Tri-Motor 5-AT

    She said this ain't the USA.

    "maybe can do but not me".

    Sounds like she know of what she speak....
    To be called a "Has Been" I must surmise, is much Greater than to be called a "Nevah Been"... JW...



  6. #31
    Papatara mupitara's Avatar
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    Default Re: Ford Tri-Motor 5-AT

    Quote Originally Posted by Jonh View Post
    The Curtiss-Wright model 20 must be the C-46. When it came out, it was the world's largest airplane.
    Yes, the CW-20 is frequently referred to by its military designation C-46 and/or military moniker ¨Commander¨. The Curtis-Wright factory designation was CW-20, and, in civilian service should be described as such. While it obviously could be described as an UGLY design, it certainly could claim some great advantages over the much smaller DC-3with respect to cargo capacity while still being an excellent choice for flying into the relatively small strips in the bush.

    I did have an opportunity to see a LANICA CW-20 parked alongside a FANG AC-47 Spooky (I think) at Puerto Cabezas 11/5/78. I was struck by the fact that the CW-20 dwarfed the much smaller Douglas Corporation design!

    The DC-3 is generally more recognized from this period since many more of them went into service.

    In my opinion, however, the CW-20 much better met the needs for transport on the atlantic coast of Nicaragua during the period that it saw service here.
    Papatara, S.A. - Semaforos de Montoya 3c al sur y 1/2c abajo, frente ENIMOSA, Managua, Nicaragua
    Hotel Papatara - Alamikamba, Municipio de Prinzapolka, RAAN, Nicaragua

  7. #32
    Active TRN Member dixietraveller's Avatar
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    Default Re: Ford Tri-Motor 5-AT

    Quote Originally Posted by mupitara View Post
    . . . The DC-3 is generally more recognized from this period since many more of them went into service.
    The DC-3 was first plane I ever flew on back in the 1950s on Piedmont I believe. Those were the good ol' days! Just park outside the terminal, walk in (pass the line of life insurance vending machines - can't imagine why they disappeared! ), buy your ticket and check your baggage, and just walk out on the tarmac - all hassle-free without even having to take off your shoes! And the stewardess would even give you free chewing gum! But I wax nostalgic again!
    O quantum est in rebus inane! / A palabras necias, oídos sordos

  8. #33
    Papatara mupitara's Avatar
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    Default Re: Ford Tri-Motor 5-AT

    Quote Originally Posted by Little Corn Tom View Post
    Sometimes ya just gotta go do it....

    Too much information only slows ya down.
    You have a point, but, if you don´t know whats out there, you really have no idea what to do, or, how to get it done. Additionally, when you get there (here) you have no idea what you should have to pay since nobody posts prices here! To top it off, usually the ones who show themselves first to new arrivals are the shysters, hucksters, and otherwise bad types!

    I really think that a visitor deserves better than that. But, if one doesn´t do one´s homework beforehand, be prepared for a letdown!
    Papatara, S.A. - Semaforos de Montoya 3c al sur y 1/2c abajo, frente ENIMOSA, Managua, Nicaragua
    Hotel Papatara - Alamikamba, Municipio de Prinzapolka, RAAN, Nicaragua

  9. #34
    House SOB Little Corn Tom's Avatar
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    Default Re: Ford Tri-Motor 5-AT

    Quote Originally Posted by mupitara View Post
    You have a point, but, if you don´t know whats out there, you really have no idea what to do, or, how to get it done. Additionally, when you get there (here) you have no idea what you should have to pay since nobody posts prices here! To top it off, usually the ones who show themselves first to new arrivals are the shysters, hucksters, and otherwise bad types!

    I really think that a visitor deserves better than that. But, if one doesn´t do one´s homework beforehand, be prepared for a letdown!
    As I look back on some bad decisions made in my life... I realize that your statement (in bold) is so true.
    Life's different here ... It's a whole 'nother pace.

  10. #35

    Default Re: Ford Tri-Motor 5-AT

    Quote Originally Posted by mupitara View Post
    Cocoland was the name used for what today is called Buenos Aires (near Kuiguitigni) on the highway to Waspam. There was also a turnoff at Switch Moss which crossed Rio Wawa at Snaki (a rocky and shallow rapids across the river). I understand that the steel base for the bridge can still be seen there. For years, the highway engineers have tried to convince the RAAN government to relocate the present highway to this route rather than the flood prone Wawa Boom Ferry crossing. The RAAN government, and, especially YATAMA won´t agree because they get the proceeds from the ferry!

    The real power in the lumber business was NIPCO (Nicaraguan Longleaf Pine Company) which was owned by Robinson Lumber Company, New Orleans, LA). There were many small lumber operations, but, most sold to NIPCO.
    Dad and my grandfather worked for NIPCO back in the day, dad worked for the railroad part. Standard Fruit(another New Orleans enterprise) was the first to use the railway, followed by Robinson Lumber. In my youth(long time ago) they helped Port to be a nice booming town, had something going. People came from all over to work at Port and The Mining Triangle. I often wondered why their was no railroad linking the two Coasts to own another.

  11. #36
    House SOB Little Corn Tom's Avatar
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    Default Re: Ford Tri-Motor 5-AT

    Quote Originally Posted by lchalljr View Post
    Dad and my grandfather worked for NIPCO back in the day, dad worked for the railroad part. Standard Fruit(another New Orleans enterprise) was the first to use the railway, followed by Robinson Lumber. In my youth(long time ago) they helped Port to be a nice booming town, had something going. People came from all over to work at Port and The Mining Triangle. I often wondered why their was no railroad linking the two Coasts to own another.
    Nice post..thanks.

    I had a long talk with a woman from Orinoco who longed for the days of Samoza because there was commerce then and there was money to be made trading vegetables, fruits shrimp and fish.

    Now nothing....only drugs and a lost generation of youth as a result.

    Very sad situation.

    Not so sure the US is much different.
    Life's different here ... It's a whole 'nother pace.

  12. #37

    Default Re: Ford Tri-Motor 5-AT

    Quote Originally Posted by Little Corn Tom View Post
    Nice post..thanks.

    I had a long talk with a woman from Orinoco who longed for the days of Samoza because there was commerce then and there was money to be made trading vegetables, fruits shrimp and fish.

    Now nothing....only drugs and a lost generation of youth as a result.

    Very sad situation.

    Not so sure the US is much different.
    No problem at all. You had many people who were not the biggest fans of the Samoza regime, but enjoyed the days he was in power because of the investment from American and Canadian companies. Albeit some of the dealings were shady, I did not find these things out until my daughter found things on the Internet about it. In many instances the companies had more rule over many towns than the government did. The bright side was people had more opportunities. The biggest problem was the Boom and Busts cycles on the Coast, which made my parents decide to move to America.

    The last time I was in Nicaragua, 1997 for a funeral, it looked like a totally different place. I understand when places age they run down, but the aging process seemed to happened exponentially in my home-town.

  13. #38
    Viejo del Foro Just Plain John Wayne's Avatar
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    Default Re: Ford Tri-Motor 5-AT

    I agree with ya about things. and LCT does make a valid point about of "New" commerce. As it comes in the morals seem to adjust themselves because of one single benifit with just a few people and the spin off misery to others of the next generation pays, that is the ones who live thru it.

    We have another member here that was born in Port and often speaks of coming for a visit, I know how it is wondering about ya cradle and nurturing day's, is anyone left that remembers, casting ya eyes about and finding it hasn't changed much, but yet very much at the same time... Etc. Am I making sense here?

    The War had everything torn up, run down, and people clustered in places that had emptied the outlying areas. And yes, just about all the older ones left longed for the day's of yesteryear when their money had not only strength and buying power, but many things were available to purchase.

    Children were made to go to school, and the parks were not outdoor flop houses. So I guess there is inherent in mankind the swings of prosperity and decay...
    To be called a "Has Been" I must surmise, is much Greater than to be called a "Nevah Been"... JW...



  14. #39

    Default Re: Ford Tri-Motor 5-AT

    Quote Originally Posted by Just Plain John Wayne View Post
    I agree with ya about things. and LCT does make a valid point about of "New" commerce. As it comes in the morals seem to adjust themselves because of one single benifit with just a few people and the spin off misery to others of the next generation pays, that is the ones who live thru it.

    We have another member here that was born in Port and often speaks of coming for a visit, I know how it is wondering about ya cradle and nurturing day's, is anyone left that remembers, casting ya eyes about and finding it hasn't changed much, but yet very much at the same time... Etc. Am I making sense here?

    The War had everything torn up, run down, and people clustered in places that had emptied the outlying areas. And yes, just about all the older ones left longed for the day's of yesteryear when their money had not only strength and buying power, but many things were available to purchase.

    Children were made to go to school, and the parks were not outdoor flop houses. So I guess there is inherent in mankind the swings of prosperity and decay...
    I asked both my brother went down to Port last summer and my cousin who still lives down their what was the main industry They both said drugs. It seems the Coast has been hit with too many empty promises and the war, which you mentioned as well. For me I was caught up in my own life, I only thought about Port when family and other Portenos mentioned it and I look up and things look bad. Many of the young ones have no choice but to immigrate elsewhere.

    Some of my best memories as a kid, was being with my dad looking at the planes and he would identify the correct model.

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