Results 1 to 21 of 21

Thread: Getting Creative With Ayote (Calabaza)

  1. #1
    Papatara mupitara's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Managua/Alamikamba/Walpa Yakalban/Bonanza
    Posts
    464
    Blog Entries
    23

    Default Getting Creative With Ayote (Calabaza)

    Because of an unusually wet summer (dry season) here on the Rio Prinzapolka, most of our traditional summer crops didn´t make, or, at least they were severely damaged by frequent rains.

    Watermelon, our primary cash crop, was completely ruined due to the rains. Most families spend the entire month of March and part of April camping in their watermelon patches on the beach by the river protecting their precious watermelons from vandals. By late February, there were no camps because the watermelons had all become rotten or tasteless due to excessive rains.

    Red beans, our primary subsistence crop as well as a cash crop, produced. But, the continued rains caused beans to sprout inside their pods before they could be harvested. Many people estimated that more than half of their beans had to be discarded because of this.

    Other frequently planted summer crops (e.g. canteloupe, cucumber, beets, cabbage, carrot) also failed to make.

    Ayote, which is one vegetable which some folks here frequently plant, did produce well. As a result, we have been eating young (tender) ayote and mature (hard) ayote at every meal as well as in-between for about two months. now.

    Ayote, which is a calabaza or squash which originated in Central America with characteristics similar to pumpkin in the US, is a native food plant which does not receive the importance it deserves. In earlier cultures here, calabasa was considered one of the major foods along with corn, beans, and tubers such as potato or uzi (ñami). Calabaza is very high in vitamins A and B (niacin and thiamine), kerotine, antioxidants, amino acids, calcium, magnesium, potasium, and iron. Not only is the fruit highly nutritive, the seeds can also be of value in controlling hypertension and enlarged prostate.

    Today, most folks here only eat young ayote boiled in soups. The mature ayote is usually only eaten as a dessert cooked in dulce (a form of brown sugar). Beans, rice, yuca, bread, tortilla, quajada, fish, beef make up most of the local diet. Green vegetables, fruits, and calabaza seldom show up on the menu.

    Recently, we have used ayote in bean soup, squash casserole, squash pancakes, pumpkin pie filling (hot, room temp, and frozen), egg soufflé, baked squash with grated cheese, wabúl (an Indian drink), breaded and fried ayote, atól (gruel), ayote cubed on spaghetti, and other dishes which I´ve already forgotten or would prefer not to recall.

    This morning I tried fresh (uncooked) ayote juice (strained from grated mature ayote) with naranjilla (from our patio). I was pleasantly surprised. The uncooked ayote juice tastes somewhat like carrot juice with a flavor more like pumpkin. The naranjilla has a tart, fresh taste with a hint of a grassy flavor.

    Our next ayote experiment will be grated raw calabaza using a carrot slaw recipe (with raisins, pineapple, lemon juice, and mayonaise).

    If anyone has more ideas for us, please post them. I´m expecting another boatload of ayotes this week!
    Papatara, S.A. - Semaforos de Montoya 3c al sur y 1/2c abajo, frente ENIMOSA, Managua, Nicaragua
    Hotel Papatara - Alamikamba, Municipio de Prinzapolka, RAAN, Nicaragua

  2. #2
    Viejo del Foro Just Plain John Wayne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Puerto Cabezas Nicar
    Posts
    13,263
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default Re: Getting Creative With Ayote (Calabaza)

    You have said exactly what I have been saying.

    It has been to much of a Wet Dry Season
    To be called a "Has Been" I must surmise, is much Greater than to be called a "Nevah Been"... JW...



  3. #3
    Para aquí para acá Jonh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    La Florida
    Posts
    15,564
    Blog Entries
    15

    Default Re: Getting Creative With Ayote (Calabaza)

    I love ayote, I'd be in heaven there, Dud! I didn't realize it was so full of good nutrients either - I'll have to eat more of it.

  4. #4
    Papatara mupitara's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Managua/Alamikamba/Walpa Yakalban/Bonanza
    Posts
    464
    Blog Entries
    23

    Default Re: Getting Creative With Ayote (Calabaza)

    Quote Originally Posted by Jonh View Post
    I love ayote, I'd be in heaven there, Dud! I didn't realize it was so full of good nutrients either - I'll have to eat more of it.
    Yes, the ayotes are amazingly nutritive and have great properties to help prevent or combat heart disease, high blood pressure, arthritis, asma, constipation, burns, parasites, cataracts, cancers (including colon cancer), enlarged prostate, high cholesterol, obesity, problems of the nervous system, liquid retencion, diabetes. (Las Calabazas Como Alimento, and Calabazas, Propiedades Medicinales)
    Papatara, S.A. - Semaforos de Montoya 3c al sur y 1/2c abajo, frente ENIMOSA, Managua, Nicaragua
    Hotel Papatara - Alamikamba, Municipio de Prinzapolka, RAAN, Nicaragua

  5. #5
    Viejo del Foro El Greco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Miami,Kendall
    Posts
    2,326

    Default Re: Getting Creative With Ayote (Calabaza)

    Ayote Potato Fritters:
    boil equal parts of ayote and potato in pot with salted water, mash and add milk, butter and salt and pepper to tatse to make a puree, set aside in the refrigerator until cold, once cold! in a bowl add the puree, 1 egg(depending how much you gonna make) Nica queso ahumado(crumbled), queso seco(crumbled), flour, chopped parsley, garlic powder, and combine everything until you incorporate all ingredients well... adjust salt and pepper if needed, shape into little fritters and fry them up.
    Dios es Amor!

  6. #6

    Default Re: Getting Creative With Ayote (Calabaza)

    Quote Originally Posted by El Greco View Post
    Ayote Potato Fritters:
    boil equal parts of ayote and potato in pot with salted water, mash and add milk, butter and salt and pepper to tatse to make a puree, set aside in the refrigerator until cold, once cold! in a bowl add the puree, 1 egg(depending how much you gonna make) Nica queso ahumado(crumbled), queso seco(crumbled), flour, chopped parsley, garlic powder, and combine everything until you incorporate all ingredients well... adjust salt and pepper if needed, shape into little fritters and fry them up.
    Now that sounds appetizing.

  7. #7
    Viejo del Foro El Greco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Miami,Kendall
    Posts
    2,326

    Default Re: Getting Creative With Ayote (Calabaza)

    Quote Originally Posted by robertharvey View Post
    Now that sounds appetizing.
    Thank You Kindly Harvey!
    Dios es Amor!

  8. #8
    Viejo del Foro Just Plain John Wayne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Puerto Cabezas Nicar
    Posts
    13,263
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default Re: Getting Creative With Ayote (Calabaza)

    Quote Originally Posted by El Greco View Post
    Thank You Kindly Harvey!
    Frog Damn it now you are trying to kill me too.

    What has this place turned in too?

    I love the food suggestions I really I am just kidding, Some people in the States have to go way out of their way to get what is ready available to us.

    I love the National Cheese, but I want it cooked in a dish first.
    To be called a "Has Been" I must surmise, is much Greater than to be called a "Nevah Been"... JW...



  9. #9
    Papatara mupitara's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Managua/Alamikamba/Walpa Yakalban/Bonanza
    Posts
    464
    Blog Entries
    23

    Default Re: Getting Creative With Ayote (Calabaza)

    Quote Originally Posted by El Greco View Post
    Ayote Potato Fritters:
    boil equal parts of ayote and potato in pot with salted water, mash and add milk, butter and salt and pepper to tatse to make a puree, set aside in the refrigerator until cold, once cold! in a bowl add the puree, 1 egg(depending how much you gonna make) Nica queso ahumado(crumbled), queso seco(crumbled), flour, chopped parsley, garlic powder, and combine everything until you incorporate all ingredients well... adjust salt and pepper if needed, shape into little fritters and fry them up.
    Sounds Delicious!

    One question: Do you use ayote tierno or ayote maduro. The ayote tierno is not nearly as sweet as the ayote maduro. But, the ayote tierno seems to stay firmer upon cooking.

    One comment: We find that ayote puree (especially maduro) becomes quite watery and virtually everything that we cook from it fails to firm up as well as we think that it should. I suppose that chilling it helps. But, we are now grating then draining off excess liquid before cooking in order to reduce water content for a firmer result. Adding flour or pancake mix makes the solution more solid. But, it loses flavor.

    Second comment: We may try substituting uzi (ñami) instead of potato to keep it more miskito!
    Papatara, S.A. - Semaforos de Montoya 3c al sur y 1/2c abajo, frente ENIMOSA, Managua, Nicaragua
    Hotel Papatara - Alamikamba, Municipio de Prinzapolka, RAAN, Nicaragua

  10. #10
    Papatara mupitara's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Managua/Alamikamba/Walpa Yakalban/Bonanza
    Posts
    464
    Blog Entries
    23

    Default Re: Getting Creative With Ayote (Calabaza)

    Quote Originally Posted by Just Plain John Wayne View Post
    Frog Damn it now you are trying to kill me too.

    What has this place turned in too?

    I love the food suggestions I really I am just kidding, Some people in the States have to go way out of their way to get what is ready available to us.

    I love the National Cheese, but I want it cooked in a dish first.
    Actually, I´ve been thinking of trying to make an ayote (maduro) puree with cuajada soup. With the right seasonings, I think that such a combination should be delicious! We make our own cuajada by the way.
    Papatara, S.A. - Semaforos de Montoya 3c al sur y 1/2c abajo, frente ENIMOSA, Managua, Nicaragua
    Hotel Papatara - Alamikamba, Municipio de Prinzapolka, RAAN, Nicaragua

  11. #11
    Viejo del Foro El Greco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Miami,Kendall
    Posts
    2,326

    Default Re: Getting Creative With Ayote (Calabaza)

    Quote Originally Posted by mupitara View Post
    Sounds Delicious!

    One question: Do you use ayote tierno or ayote maduro. The ayote tierno is not nearly as sweet as the ayote maduro. But, the ayote tierno seems to stay firmer upon cooking.

    One comment: We find that ayote puree (especially maduro) becomes quite watery and virtually everything that we cook from it fails to firm up as well as we think that it should. I suppose that chilling it helps. But, we are now grating then draining off excess liquid before cooking in order to reduce water content for a firmer result. Adding flour or pancake mix makes the solution more solid. But, it loses flavor.

    Second comment: We may try substituting uzi (ñami) instead of potato to keep it more miskito!
    question 1:Use The one that can be made into a puree, 1stcomment: once the ayote and potato finish boiling return to pot without water so excess liquid evaporates(25 seconds). second comment: yes by all means
    Dios es Amor!

  12. #12
    Dog Whisperer cookshow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Right Here
    Posts
    5,074
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default Re: Getting Creative With Ayote (Calabaza)

    Pigs love them. My first year I had an acre of calabaza, it was out of hand. I was picking a wheelbarrow load at a time, could not give them away fast enough. People here either eat it in soup or make the local ¨cake¨with it.
    ‎"You know what you say when people tell you you can't do something? Fool, shut your mouth up!"
    Ernie K Doe

  13. #13
    Dog Whisperer cookshow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Right Here
    Posts
    5,074
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default Re: Getting Creative With Ayote (Calabaza)

    Been picking a few Calabaza lately, so far giving them away but have a few reserved for the Pot. Have a small plot of Corn almost ready. Ran across this recipe that looks tasty and I have most the ingredients at hand or easily available.



    http://cooklikeajamaican.com/jamaican-corn-soup/
    ‎"You know what you say when people tell you you can't do something? Fool, shut your mouth up!"
    Ernie K Doe

  14. #14
    Viejo del Foro Just Plain John Wayne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Puerto Cabezas Nicar
    Posts
    13,263
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default Re: Getting Creative With Ayote (Calabaza)

    Quote Originally Posted by cookshow View Post
    Been picking a few Calabaza lately, so far giving them away but have a few reserved for the Pot. Have a small plot of Corn almost ready. Ran across this recipe that looks tasty and I have most the ingredients at hand or easily available.



    http://cooklikeajamaican.com/jamaican-corn-soup/
    Uuuuu Weee, bet with some cured ham in it it would make a puppy pull a Freight Train...
    To be called a "Has Been" I must surmise, is much Greater than to be called a "Nevah Been"... JW...



  15. #15

    Default Re: Getting Creative With Ayote (Calabaza)

    Agreed that would be tasty. Might need to get the corn off the cob first tho.

    Speaking of corn JW, you going to make more Corn Wine this year for the holidays?

  16. #16
    Viejo del Foro Just Plain John Wayne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Puerto Cabezas Nicar
    Posts
    13,263
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default Re: Getting Creative With Ayote (Calabaza)

    Quote Originally Posted by kwah2249 View Post
    Agreed that would be tasty. Might need to get the corn off the cob first tho.

    Speaking of corn JW, you going to make more Corn Wine this year for the holidays?
    Little late on it for quality, but these Indians don't give a sheit as long as it makes them fall face first to the ground...

    I need to go on and put a couple of barrels on....
    To be called a "Has Been" I must surmise, is much Greater than to be called a "Nevah Been"... JW...



  17. #17
    Viejo del Foro Daddy-YO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Philly - León
    Posts
    1,505
    Blog Entries
    6

    Default Re: Getting Creative With Ayote (Calabaza)

    Speaking of squash & corn spirits, as I sipped some fine Kentucky straight bourbon the other night, I notice my sweet, little Nica wife is getting rounder. Not unlike the seasonal pumpkins. It's pumpkin pie she's become addicted to on this stateside visit. Never before have I seen anyone have a slice with breakfast.

    Back in Leon she whips up a mean ayote dish. Love it. Here I do all the cooking. And regularly use the local ayote/calabaza, like acorn & yellow squash. Cooking zucchini, it's always with mozzarella &/or Parmesan cheese, marinara sauce and oregano, basil & rosemary; I suppose it's the name of that squash that puts me on auto-chef. Ditto making pumpkin bread; always with cinnamon, nutmeg & clove. Why mess with a perfected combination?
    I never met a Semite I didn't like.

  18. #18

    Default Re: Getting Creative With Ayote (Calabaza)

    Quote Originally Posted by Just Plain John Wayne View Post
    Little late on it for quality, but these Indians don't give a sheit as long as it makes them fall face first to the ground...


    I was able to get a taste of it while on Big Corn and that was after it had ridden around on the boat a while. Was fine to me.

  19. #19
    Viejo del Foro Just Plain John Wayne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Puerto Cabezas Nicar
    Posts
    13,263
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default Re: Getting Creative With Ayote (Calabaza)

    I have a mean streak in me.. Instead of using 100 pounds of sugar in the fermentation stage of it, I could go on and triple it or quadruple it like I was making corn likker to distill...

    At would get 'em Beer Hogs a going sure nuff...
    To be called a "Has Been" I must surmise, is much Greater than to be called a "Nevah Been"... JW...



  20. #20
    Dog Whisperer cookshow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Right Here
    Posts
    5,074
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default Re: Getting Creative With Ayote (Calabaza)

    Quote Originally Posted by Just Plain John Wayne View Post
    Uuuuu Weee, bet with some cured ham in it it would make a puppy pull a Freight Train...
    I did make this last year and it turned out real nice. I would have added Smoked Ham or Pickled Pork but was planning to share it with a Friend that does not eat Pork. I grated some of the Corn into it, also cut some off the cob, and then added a few handfuls of the Baby Corn. The Yellow Split Peas were an odd find in Bluefields and not sure I ever ate any in my life before that. Was a Real Thick, Hearty Soup, wish I had been able to get some suitable Bread to go along with it for cleaning the bowl.

    What got me thinking about this is that I received some "Pumpkin" (as we call it in Creole) Seeds from Jamaica this week.
    ‎"You know what you say when people tell you you can't do something? Fool, shut your mouth up!"
    Ernie K Doe

  21. #21

    Default Re: Getting Creative With Ayote (Calabaza)

    ( . . . . ..We make our own cuajada by the way. ..)


    What is your recipe/system? I'd like to give cuajada a try.
    We always have more milk than we can use up.

    Pig will be disappointed, though.

    Missed this thread, lots of good stuff here.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Also visit the False Bluff Blog!