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Thread: Leg of Lamb

  1. #1

    Default Leg of Lamb

    I'm a lambaholic. What kind of prices can I espect to pay for some good juicy lamb? Not talking about restaraunt lamb. I like to cook dead animals myself.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Leg of Lamb

    You could buy a whole Pelibuey for a about 500 or 600 cords (6 to 8 months old) and cook it yourself, the way you want to.

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    Active TRN Member dixietraveller's Avatar
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    Default Re: Leg of Lamb

    Quote Originally Posted by Swanny View Post
    I'm a lambaholic. What kind of prices can I espect to pay for some good juicy lamb? Not talking about restaraunt lamb. I like to cook dead animals myself.
    I suspect you're going to find it's hard (or virtually impossible to find), but maybe some current residents can offer a more optimistic assessment. I'm certainly not an expert on sheep production in Nicaragua!

    The fritangas I frequented in Nicaragua never had mutton on a brocheta, and I did ask because that was something I did miss from China. In China mutton was about the same price as beef and all the Chinese versions of fritangas sold mutton on a skewer, and very thinly sliced mutton was one of the main meat selections used in Chinese Hot Pot. I doubt if you can even find Australian or New Zealand (frozen) imported leg of lamb in Managua supermarkets, but then I've never looked for it there.

    You may have to settle for goat!
    O quantum est in rebus inane! / A palabras necias, oídos sordos

  4. #4

    Default Re: Leg of Lamb

    I might have to move to China then!

    Ah, I'll survive without I suppose...

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    Active TRN Member dixietraveller's Avatar
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    Default Re: Leg of Lamb

    Quote Originally Posted by Rivense67 View Post
    You could buy a whole Pelibuey for a about 500 or 600 cords (6 to 8 months old) and cook it yourself, the way you want to.
    @ Swanny -
    Pelibuey = m. colq. Hibrido del cruce de caprino y bovino. (from DEN)
    O quantum est in rebus inane! / A palabras necias, oídos sordos

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    Active TRN Member dixietraveller's Avatar
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    Default Re: Leg of Lamb

    Quote Originally Posted by Swanny View Post
    I might have to move to China then!

    Ah, I'll survive without I suppose...
    But the brochetas de res in the fritangas are really delicious and inexpensive! (Although it would be nice to have the mutton too!)
    O quantum est in rebus inane! / A palabras necias, oídos sordos

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    Para aquí para acá Jonh's Avatar
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    Default Re: Leg of Lamb

    I thought pelibuey was just a short haired tropical sheep. A cross between a cow and a goat? Puh-leez!

  8. #8
    Active TRN Member dixietraveller's Avatar
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    Default Re: Leg of Lamb

    Quote Originally Posted by Jonh View Post
    I thought pelibuey was just a short haired tropical sheep. A cross between a cow and a goat? Puh-leez!
    Well, I'm certainly no expert on livestock breeding, but that's what DEN states!

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    Para aquí para acá Jonh's Avatar
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    Default Re: Leg of Lamb

    Well, a pelibuey is a breed of sheep. Period. I have no idea if they're good eats, as I don't care for mutton myself.

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    Junkyard Dog randude's Avatar
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    Default Re: Leg of Lamb

    I went to a party one time with some of my counter culture friends. They had a Goat spinning around over a spit... it looked like a German Shepard.

    I just had the noodle salad.
    Survivor

  11. #11
    Active TRN Member dixietraveller's Avatar
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    Default Re: Leg of Lamb

    Quote Originally Posted by Jonh View Post
    Well, a pelibuey is a breed of sheep. Period. I have no idea if they're good eats, as I don't care for mutton myself.
    Wikipedia agrees with you!
    The Pelibüey (also known as Cubano Rojo)[1] is a breed of domestic sheep native to the Caribbean, Mexico, South America. The Pelibüey is a breed of hair sheep, meaning they do not generally grow wool. This adaptation makes them especially useful for tropical environments where heavily-wooled sheep do not thrive. The breed is thought to originate in Africa, specifically from the West African Dwarf sheep.[2] This breed is primarily raised for meat.[1]
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pelib%C3%BCey_%28sheep%29
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    Junkyard Dog randude's Avatar
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    Default Re: Leg of Lamb

    Is this one of them Pelibüey?
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  13. #13

    Default Re: Leg of Lamb

    Quote Originally Posted by Swanny View Post
    I'm a lambaholic. What kind of prices can I espect to pay for some good juicy lamb? Not talking about restaraunt lamb. I like to cook dead animals myself.
    Renco has a source...I mean we are talking Leg of lamb, rack of lamb...as good as it gets

    not that damn goat that one needs to marinate in vodka for a few days...then toss out the goat and drink the vodka

    You just need to wait for Renco to stop herding pigs at the beach; and check-in on the TRN

    What a treat...
    PP

  14. #14
    Active TRN Member dixietraveller's Avatar
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    Default Re: Leg of Lamb

    All of this makes me wonder if I was incorrectly asking for mutton since I always asked about carne de carnero (using my trusty Merriam-Webster Spanish-English Dictionary for mutton). Should I have asked for carne de pelibuey or even carne de oveja or would this meat only be found in carnicerias and not in the fritangas? Maybe there's plenty of mutton after all in Nicaragua if only one knows how to ask for it correctly!
    O quantum est in rebus inane! / A palabras necias, oídos sordos

  15. #15
    Active TRN Member dixietraveller's Avatar
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    Default Re: Leg of Lamb

    Quote Originally Posted by Jonh View Post
    Well, a pelibuey is a breed of sheep. Period. . . . .
    You realize you've shattered my faith in DEN!
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    Para aquí para acá Jonh's Avatar
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    Default Re: Leg of Lamb

    I've been confounded many times by Nicas calling sheep goats and vice versa, so it might not matter what you call it.

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    Default Re: Leg of Lamb

    La Colonia sells frozen leg of lamb. Bring a Brinks truck when you go shopping for it!
    I rent rooms in my house by the day, week, month.

  18. #18

    Default Re: Leg of Lamb

    Any ideas why it's so hard to find? Is the climate too rough to raise them?

  19. #19
    Para aquí para acá Jonh's Avatar
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    Default Re: Leg of Lamb

    Pelibuey is supposed to be bred especially for the climate, so maybe there's just not so much demand?

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Leg of Lamb

    We raised pelibuey on the finca several years ago, mainly for feeding our dogs the raw meaty bones. I would take one leg and the backstrap from each animal for ourselves and make all kinds of dishes. It's d*mn fine eating, not at all like mutton. Even when we butchered the older males, there was no gamey flavor.

    I've been eating to much duck lately to know exactly where to get live pelibuey, but they're definitely around. There should be some pix on here of dishes I've done with the pelibuey, I'd have to do a search to find them...

    And yes, John, you are correct, pelibuey are a warm weather sheep, though there are lots of rumors to the contrary.
    "Patience is a virtue, but persistence to the point of success is a blessing."

  21. #21
    TRN's fiesty redhead catahoula fan's Avatar
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    Default Re: Leg of Lamb

    Pelibuey chops...


    Leg of pelibuey...
    "Patience is a virtue, but persistence to the point of success is a blessing."

  22. #22
    Viejo del Foro El Greco's Avatar
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    Default Re: Leg of Lamb

    have you roasted a Peliguey whole??
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    Default Re: Leg of Lamb

    No, but I could get my fella to do it easy enough. His whole pig is almost famous! Let me look around and find out what the price is, shouldn't be too much if I can avoid gettin' gringoed. 'Course, it's not really the time of year to plan for roasting a whole animal, weather is too iffy. Doesn't look like we're gonna get a real canicula this year. If I get it done, I'll invite some folks in country over and we'll post pix!
    "Patience is a virtue, but persistence to the point of success is a blessing."

  24. #24
    Dog Whisperer cookshow's Avatar
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    Default Re: Leg of Lamb

    Watching the weather here I think some dry is coming. The first 48 hours back on the Island we saw 10" of rain, kinda dry since then and a strong breeze, unseasonal.

    There are some real "sheep" here and a few other cross breeds I cannot identify.
    ‎"You know what you say when people tell you you can't do something? Fool, shut your mouth up!"
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  25. #25
    Viejo del Foro Just Plain John Wayne's Avatar
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    Default Re: Leg of Lamb

    They breed like pigs....

    Gaston and Campbell had 40 or 50 in a place outside of town with a watchie and all the food they could eat.

    Seems like the watchie would go to sleep in the night and one or two would dissapear, I guess the chickens ate them.

    They are nice eating but like a white tailed deer, not much fat on them to cook in it's juices what I do is a slow roast if trying to do the whole body, and turning often and brush it with hog lard quite frequently so it doesn't get to dry; and the black you see on it is in all likely the smoke from the nancitie wood or the green leaves from the Guava tree for the nicest flavor ever been in a piece of meat. I think that was not burned but the smoke makes it look that way.

    For a small batch I smoke it first good with the above and then finish in in the oven in the house in a speckled oval roasting pan so it don't dry out and at the half way mark I souse down on it with cream of mushroom soup and plenty onions and garlic.
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