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Thread: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

  1. #51
    Junkyard Dog randude's Avatar
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    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    I have been working around diesel engines for most of my career, but not so much at the moment. My end of it is control and monitoring. Never once turned a wrench on a diesel though. I know that we put overspeed trips on all the engines I have ever specified or contributed input into procurement. Never heard about one running freefall like that, but knew the possibility exist. When you don't need a spark plug to cause ignition the potential is there. I am not sure exactly what an overspeed trip does, but I passed that specification down from the ABS of Shipping and to the supplier. Cat has always been the most used engine I have been apart of, but not the most desired.
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  2. #52
    Viejo del Foro Just Plain John Wayne's Avatar
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    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    CAT's and Cummins are the more economical of the top three, Detroit (spelled it right that time) when I was a kid had that problem of losing control and it came from the blowers on the engines devoloping oil leaks and slinging lube oil right into the air inlet box, entering the scavegeing ports to the cylinders on the down stroke of the piston. In the heated evrion it too will bust off.<BR>

    <BR>Originaly they had no ESD emergancy shut down, hell they were only built for a hot rod in landing craft during WWll 160 HP in a 6-71&nbsp; Towers and Johnson pulls now over 700 HP out of the new improved model, Plenty of get up and go for a light engine, but will not strech a fuel dollar.<BR>

    <BR>But they became known as a "Poor Mans Engine" because they were so simple to fix and keep going that just about anyone could do their own repairs and even a stooge would get away with a lot of errors and the basturd still run with a multitude of sins wrong with it. But sling and drip lube oil like hell.<BR>

    <BR>When one took off and "Ran Away" what generaly happened is at some stage of things flying around and around they had a tendency to just come un-glued. They were not balanced well to exceed 2000 rpm.s<BR>

    <BR>Towers and Johnson in Ft Lauderdale started balancing them to 3800 RPM's and polished ports and all the other hot rod stuff, Turbos, Inter-coolers, After-coolers, etc, but still those leaks began and overlooked in the begining could not be effectively sealed. This and low fuel effency in a 2 cycle engine will be soon history IMO
    To be called a "Has Been" I must surmise, is much Greater than to be called a "Nevah Been"... JW...



  3. #53
    TRN Science officer bill_bly_ca's Avatar
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    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    The worst is when a Turbo lets go. As it is directly on the intake, Oil will gush into the air path and quickly trash the Engine.

    A fellow (in south Africa) on the Mitsubishi list I typed on had a 1988 Pajero like mine but he shoehorned the 3.1 DID (1995) in place.. The Turbo let go.. Luckly he had a 5 spmanual transmission and was in 5th. His (4 wheel disk) brakes were just strong enough to stall the pig before it went non linear...

    My Oil burner is in for its 200,000 km service (at 185,000 km) Water pump, injectors, timing belt, Cam seals, front and back crank seals, upper ball joints and back Axel seals. I miss it even though the Expedition is a nicer ride...
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  4. #54
    TRN Science officer bill_bly_ca's Avatar
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    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    Quote Originally Posted by randude View Post
    One of my buddies, a mechanical engineer that uses bio diesel for his VW told me that diesel was invented to run on peanut oil.
    That was Dr Diesel's original plan http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rudolf_Diesel
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  5. #55
    Junkyard Dog randude's Avatar
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    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    Because my end has always been electrical the bulk of my experience was in generators. On one ship I worked on we had 8 Caterpillar 3612 engines and an emergency/auxiliary Cat 3508. For those slightly interested, the 36 or 35 part was the block size and the two numbers that followed were how many cylinders. So A 3612 is a 12 cylinder.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sea-based_X-band_Radar
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    Last edited by randude; 06-24-2012 at 09:00 PM.
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  6. #56
    Viejo del Foro Just Plain John Wayne's Avatar
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    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    Quote Originally Posted by randude View Post
    Because my end has always been electrical the bulk of my experience was in generators. On one ship I worked on we had 8 Caterpillar 3612 engines and an emergency/auxiliary Cat 3508. For those slightly interested, the 36 or 35 part was the block size and the two numbers that followed were how many cylinders. So A 3612 is a 12 cylinder.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sea-based_X-band_Radar
    Bill is right, oil WILL burn under the right conditions and a turbo can be the same culpret as the blower on a Detroit for the whole thing going un-glued.....

    BTW I am certifyed in Cat 32 and 34 series... and Detroit 53, 71, and 92 series... But the work is so nasty I hated it.... You can take three baths in a row useing soap and a hard scrub brush and not come clean....
    To be called a "Has Been" I must surmise, is much Greater than to be called a "Nevah Been"... JW...



  7. #57
    Junkyard Dog randude's Avatar
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    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    Yeah Diesel engines are the toughest thing around, once you get past the freaking noise, smoke and diesel fumes. Like I say, diesels are almost all used to make money so we have to just all hold our noses. The only time I ever got sea sick was when I was crossing the bar in Westport Washington and forced to stand down wind of the exhaust. I really think that smell weakened me enough to let sea sickness set in... But maybe it wasn't even sea sickness, it may have just been sick of smelling diesel. Hard to believe something smells worse than gasoline.
    Survivor

  8. #58
    Active TRN Member vern's Avatar
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    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    I think the overspeed on a diesel engine is a safety device that keeps the engine from reaving to high
    I know on a locomotive if I get a very bad wheel slip the locomotive will shut down. When this happens I have to go to the engine bay and reset the overspead then restart the locomotive

    Just to brag a little. One D9 has 4000 horsepower. I can link 3 of them together and make all three pull as one giving me access to 12000 horsepower. It will make yourseat rumble a little
    my little girl

  9. #59
    Viejo del Foro Just Plain John Wayne's Avatar
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    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    Quote Originally Posted by vern View Post
    I think the overspeed on a diesel engine is a safety device that keeps the engine from reaving to high
    I know on a locomotive if I get a very bad wheel slip the locomotive will shut down. When this happens I have to go to the engine bay and reset the overspead then restart the locomotive

    Just to brag a little. One D9 has 4000 horsepower. I can link 3 of them together and make all three pull as one giving me access to 12000 horsepower. It will make yourseat rumble a little
    Hey that is great, I have often not only wondered about the aviation aspect of mechanics but Locomotive as well. Damn the advances man has made applying power and plenty of it at times to get it done.

    And if ya have done something tellin about it ain't braggin' it's just tellin about it. one of the things that really astounded me was when the Challenger blew up over Canaveral and scattered that solid rocket fuel all over the ocean floor. Well we got to catching that shit in the scallop rigs and of course warned about its un-stability.

    Of course the only difference between men and boy's is the danger of their toy's, one 'ole boy lit off a piece at a little ole picnic are back in the bush to the west of there we had for swimming and what not. only thing was it was not just a smalle fist sized piece of it like we had been doing. It was a piece about the size of a basketball. My God, the power released from that.. Had us all stepping and fetching to keep out of it's way as it flared and sputtered all around burning up. it was a hell of a display of a piece of rubber looking thing releasing it's pentup energy.

    So when Cookshoe say's "Hey, here, hold my beer and watch this" Yes, I had my day's of conducting myself in a Devil May Care" manner....

    I guess yall know one of the first experiments of man's attempt at making a small internal combustion engine, gunpowder was used as a fuel. They did not have Darwins Awords in those day's but he would have been if not a winner surely an Honorable mention...... Yes I did study engines and mans use/problems with them.
    To be called a "Has Been" I must surmise, is much Greater than to be called a "Nevah Been"... JW...



  10. #60
    Active TRN Member StickMan's Avatar
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    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    Since we are no longer talking about flipping a car, I thought I would add this. Talk of rocket fuel always makes me think about this (link provided by request instead of copying and pasting the text) event where some folks tried to see how quickly they could get charcoal (carbon for those of you in Nica land) to be ready to cook on. 3 seconds seems to be the record.

    http://www.davebarry.com/misccol/charcoal.htm

    And to see the video of some of the action (since the link provided in the article is now dead):

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UjPxDOEdsX8

    Last edited by StickMan; 06-26-2012 at 10:37 AM.
    "Find out what it is in life that you don't do well - and then don't do that thing." -The most Interesting Man in the World

  11. #61

    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    I love the whine of a turbo.

    It's like having a two motors in one, and one of them is a jet.

  12. #62
    Junkyard Dog randude's Avatar
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    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    But really, how is the beer there?
    Survivor

  13. #63

    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    I know this an old thread, but I'm curious if anyone HAS had success bringing a car into Nicaragua? I'm aware of the restrictions and costs, but it seems like there's companies that do it, for ex. http://www.a1autotransport.com/ship-...-nicaragua.php

    Am I missing something or is it just too much of a pain to deal with?

  14. #64
    TRN Science officer bill_bly_ca's Avatar
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    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    Quote Originally Posted by jimthomas View Post
    I know this an old thread, but I'm curious if anyone HAS had success bringing a car into Nicaragua? I'm aware of the restrictions and costs, but it seems like there's companies that do it, for ex. http://www.a1autotransport.com/ship-...-nicaragua.php

    Am I missing something or is it just too much of a pain to deal with?
    People have but in the end it is not too much of a benefit over buying locally..

    E.g. Ford truck parts.. Phhht.. (KWP has better data on this as he has a ford)
    Toyota tacoma parts are not the same as a Hilux.. Tacoma parts are rare.
    Hundai and Kia are good options as there are a good amount of parts..
    Honda's not really worth it..

    Like the other fellow mentioned, you need to be more specific..
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  15. #65
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    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    About 6 months ago the local (Managua) toyota and Honda dealerships have refused to service USA originated vehicles! The Honda dealership (excel) will do it on a case by case basis..but don't hold ur breathe. And I love my Honda CRV!! Take it over a Toyota any day,lol

    Not sure about the local Hyundia and Kia dealerships servicing USA originated vehicles....

  16. #66

    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    Quote Originally Posted by bill_bly_ca View Post
    People have but in the end it is not too much of a benefit over buying locally..

    E.g. Ford truck parts.. Phhht.. (KWP has better data on this as he has a ford)
    Toyota tacoma parts are not the same as a Hilux.. Tacoma parts are rare.
    Hundai and Kia are good options as there are a good amount of parts..
    Honda's not really worth it..

    Like the other fellow mentioned, you need to be more specific..
    You're starting to see quite a few of the bigger Ford trucks in Nicaragua, it's becoming a status symbol for the people who have the money, but I suspect that these are Fords from Mexico. There is a big Ford plant in Hermosillo.

    I've looked at the trucks, the body looks pretty identical, but the engine sizes don't match up, smaller than we are used to seeing in the US.

    There is a LOT of vehicle manufacturing going on in Mexico. Volkswagen has a huge operation in Puebla, I think maybe someone else too.

    I had no probllem finding parts for my Ford Windstar van last trip down. Lots of those in Mexico. Lots of really great mechanics in Mexico too, something you can always count on.

  17. #67
    TRN Science officer bill_bly_ca's Avatar
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    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    There is a 100% match on the running gear for Hyundia Excel's. Distant family has sent them down to do Taxi duty and had no issue.. You can get them at auction here for under $6k and 4 or 5 yrs old..

    All of their parts are bought from the Taiwanese parts hawkers which are based in Managua...

    On trucks as status.. Yes seen the same. There was a Nica family up here, both husband and wife had good jobs in the insurance industry (they were about 5 to 8 yrs older than us) .. Had a BAD BAD accident in 2005.. Large settlement from the insurance Co. for disability.

    They went down and kinda semi repatriated.. Dodge 2500 Cummins (Not sure how they got that there never seen a Dodge dealer in MGA) King ranch... They picked up a nephew of mine at the airport in 2010 with a fleet of US sized pickup trucks (Other Rich kids in Nica that were friends with their son, who drove it the most)

    By 2011 most if not all the cash was gone.. Their $400,000 house up here sold off and the pair of them split.. He whooping it up down there with his son and She living up here in an upscale town house with their daughter and Mother.

    I cant imagine the size of bulls eye you are wearing with a US sized pick up that is less than 5 years old... You might as well have a banner yelling "Rob me" both from la ladrones and Petronic..
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  18. #68
    Active TRN Member RGV AG's Avatar
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    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    Autostar is the Dodge/Jeep dealer in Nicaragua. You actually see quite a few full size Dodge Diesel trucks down here, they are not that rare. Most of the Ford's I have seen down here are US imports, Mexican trucks would cost a fortune as the IVA and initial tenencia on them is sky high. Nobody buys a used Mexican vehicle, that I know of, unless the SOB has been stolen.

    For a spell down here one could get the Ford Ranger Diesel pickup, made in Argentina, and that was a bad little motor scooter as the engine in it was very good. In my opinion the only way it makes sense to bring a vehicle in here is if it comes in exonerated of taxes somehow or if it is a paid for US vehicle that meets the criteria and you already own it.

    In reality the Toyota Landcruiser truck is the baddest ride down here for a truck, if you are going to get a truck that is the one to get IMO, unless you are going to be towing/hualing as that is what I see the bid Dodge's do and or used for quite a bit.

  19. #69
    TRN Science officer bill_bly_ca's Avatar
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    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    Quote Originally Posted by RGV AG View Post
    In reality the Toyota Landcruiser truck is the baddest ride down here for a truck, if you are going to get a truck that is the one to get IMO, unless you are going to be towing/hualing as that is what I see the bid Dodge's do and or used for quite a bit.
    At over $100,000K in new I read on my last trip... That's some coin.. But it will last for damn sure..

    The Cumins straight 6 is no slouch for reliability either.. Just the "Dodge" wrapped around it..
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  20. #70
    Active TRN Member RGV AG's Avatar
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    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    Bill:
    I am not sure that the price on the Toyota Landcruiser trucks is that high. I want to say that a fairly well equipped one, with the taxes and duties, is about $35-45K.

    Maybe we are talking about two different vehicles. I am talking about the basic single cabin Toyota P/U with the diesel engine.

  21. #71
    TRN Science officer bill_bly_ca's Avatar
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    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    Quote Originally Posted by RGV AG View Post
    Bill:
    I am not sure that the price on the Toyota Landcruiser trucks is that high. I want to say that a fairly well equipped one, with the taxes and duties, is about $35-45K.

    Maybe we are talking about two different vehicles. I am talking about the basic single cabin Toyota P/U with the diesel engine.
    Yep different .. I'm thinking the current 200 series SUV.. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toyota_...ser#200_Series

    The Pickup is the 70 series... Apparently from the Wiki they are at 79..

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toyota_Land_Cruiser_(J70)

    I like the 70 .. There are a few for sale in Japan that I almost imported over the last few years - Left hand drive and all.. Never sold here as road legal but they imported them for use in mines close to the Arctic where no roads go..
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  22. #72
    TRN Science officer bill_bly_ca's Avatar
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    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    Here is the little fella it is still for sale.. .. A little over 8K

    It would cost me another 3K to get it here and then $1,000 to get it on the road..



    http://www.japan-partner.com/Auto/18...-for-sale.html

    I currently have an '88 montero diesel right hand drive I imported in 2006..
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  23. #73

    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    I have a 1973 fj40 land cruiser and a 1996 fzj80 land cruiser they both get around 10-12 mpg around town, toyota never sold Diesel land cruisers or the 70 series in the US. Tough and reliable, I'd be looking for diesel hilux, Land cruiser 70 or 40 series or prado. Who wants to chip in for a Nica land cruiser I have safe garage to keep it in mga.?! Time share!

  24. #74

    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    I'd be careful about buying an older car and immediately putting thousands of miles on it, especially if you're hoping to flip it. It also has to be a newer car to qualify for import I believe, not to mention the other harmonization requirements if there are any (not sure about this). I believe these rules apply whether you drive or ship a vehicle into the country https://www.a1autotransport.com/ship...-nicaragua.php I'd make sure you have a clear understanding of that stuff before moving forward since you're counting a lot of things working out with this plan.

  25. #75
    TRN Member Mr Bossman's Avatar
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    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    For Pensioniado Residencia you can bring a car to Nicaragua duty free every 5 years. The car cannot be older than 6 years (goes by VIN #)

    To save money I recommend bringing down a 5 year old car to maximize your break even or profit after you sell the car presumably in 5 years.

    However, Once you register the car in Nic you can 'Flip' it the next day for a profit as used cars sell for 50% more in Nic.

    Choice should only be between KIA or TOYOTA as parts and knowledge base is high. If I had to do t again I would bring down a Kia Sorrento. You will be able to sell this car in Nic in 5 years for the same price you paid in USA today!

    Just to add if in Nic never buy a car unless it is registered in Nic. A few months back there was a young guy selling a beat up old class B Van registered in Canada. We asked him about this and apparently he did not know the rules. Would be impossible to register this van in Nicaragua.
    Last edited by Mr Bossman; 04-01-2015 at 06:54 PM.

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