Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Volcan Pthh

  1. #1

    Default Volcan Pthh

    This Wednesday, I decide to visit the volcano closest to Masaya—volcan Santiago (more commonly known as volcan Masaya). I left in the late morning after breakfast.

    I walked from Hostal Santa Maria down to the big open air market in Masaya. I made my way leisurely through the market in order to take advantage of the chance to see all of the interesting knick knacks. The dead frogs posed in sexual positions always make me chuckle.

    On the far side of the market, I emerged into a large field with buses all over the place. I wandered around to confirm the destination of each bus, and then I climbed on board a slow bus (anything that doesn’t say EXPRESS on the side in big letters) to Managua.

    I noticed a large area of the far side of the buses filled with people selling produce and some prepared foods under umbrellas. It looks like the market has overgrown its natural bounds.

    This bus had a flat screen television behind the driver’s chair. I’ve never seen a chicken bus with a T.V. before, only the larger buses, like Ticabus. When we started moving, the T.V. turned on, and a Spanish language version of “The Gods Must Be Crazy” began. It was a surreal experience watching that movie on a slow bus moving through Masaya.

    We inched along and eventually, left both Masaya and Nindiri. At this point the cobrador passed by and charged me C$7 to the entrance to the volcano. After Nindiri, there’s a climb up to the entrance of the volcano, and then the road levels off and starts to descend again on its way to Managua.

    I jumped off the bus and quickly crossed the street to enter the volcanic park. A ranger station blocked my path. A couple of rangers were relaxing (in a hammock and leaning back in a chair. I asked them for information about the park.

    They told me that as a non-resident, it’d cost me C$100 to get into the park. I had anticipated a higher price for being a foreigner, and I considered the C$100 fee reasonable. Then, they told me that I wasn’t allowed to walk in the park—that I need to pay another C$100 for a driver to take me to and from the volcano. Say what? Any place that doesn’t let me walk is automatically on my $#it list.

    I asked them about the glow of the volcano and night trips. They told me that there is no visible glow from the volcano currently, so a night trip isn’t any better. They added that I’m only allowed five minutes near the most active crater.

    That was it for me. I thank them for their time, and I walked back out to the road. I’m not a big fan of rules. They tend to take all of the spontaneity and fun out of life.

    I noticed the “kilometer 23” sign post near the entrance to the volcano, and I kept this in mind as I started walking back towards Masaya.

    The high level stretch of road had a great view off to the east (on the other side of the road from the volcano). I walked on that side of the road and paused often to soak in the view: fields, forests, distant mountains, open sky.

    Once I began my descent, I moved over to the west side of the road to capture brief and narrow glimpses of the volcano and the lagoon through the dense foliage. A little after the “kilometer 25” post, I arrived in Nindiri. I had never been, so when I reached the main road (after I’d already walked past most of Nindiri along the highway),I followed it back into the town. The road ends in a large park framed by a catholic church, what looks like an outdoor theatre (it has a raised platform like a stage and then a large overhanging wall behind) and a large statue of a native with a bow—presumably the namesake of the city “Nindiri.”

    This park is the most happening place I’ve seen in Masaya and arguably in all Nicaragua. It looked like every high school student in the town was hanging out and playing in the park at the same time. I walked through the park and bought a gaseosa on the far side in a pulperia for C$5 (a few cords less expensive than in Masaya). What’s up with this place?

    Very few people make eye contact and say hello to me in Masaya, at least not in the central areas I’ve been frequenting over the past week, but everyone seemed friendly in Nindiri. I may have just stumbled into Nindiri on a good day, but if not than this is a great undiscovered jewel on Nicaragua.

    I walked back to the highway and then continued my trek to Masaya. I stopped off the west side of the street in a place called Cabanas Encantadoras. They have cabins with a great view of the lagoon and the volcano for $58 for 24 hours. This is steep for me (or for someone who is staying for a long time), but it’d be a great place for a short visit of a day or two or for a romantic getaway—like a honeymoon.

    I found many places along this road with similar views of the volcano and the lagoon. I wandered into each one to ask about their prices and to sneak a peek. One was a restaurant with a swimming pool. They view there is awesome. I checked out the menu, and it looks good too. I remember the price per person per day to use the pool is C$50. But, I can’t remember the name of the place.

    I passed the “kilometer 27” before I reached the farthest turn into Masaya. This turn would take me through the San Carlos neighborhood, and I’d already walked that stretch recently, so I stayed on the highway. This took me up another rise around a large hill. On the far side, I passed the entrance to Coyotepe. I wanted to check this out, but I was starting to feel the sun, so I’ll save that for another day.

    I stopped into I chicken joint next to the entrance to Coyotepe—that shares a building with Papa Johns. I think it’s called Nancy’s. I checked out the menu, and when I discovered that it’s even more expensive than Tip-Top, I kept moving.

    I didn’t see another other kilometer markers the rest of the way into Masaya. If I had to guess, I’d say that it’s about six kilometers from Masaya to the entrance to the volcano.

    Once I got to the main entrance into Masaya, the one by the statue and the Tip-Top, I decided to check out a Posada a few blocks in that a taxi driver mentioned to me when I gave up looking last Sunday. It’s a good room with everything that I have in the Hostal Santa Maria, and they only want $140/month—versus the $10/night in Santa Maria. Yeah, I’m moving.

    After my walk, I realized a couple of things.

    One, I got to see great views of the volcano and the lagoon, and I didn’t have to pay to get into the park or be driven around.

    Two, there is no such thing as a base tan strong enough to prevent a sunburn if one is stupid enough to walk in the sun for 4 hours in the middle of the day.

    I’m burned on my forehead, y nose, and on my forearms—all of the areas where I had the best base tan. The burns were so bad, that I got the chills and diarrhea that night. I think I’ll stay out of the sun for a couple of days—before I take the long walk up to Coyotepe.
    Soy el chele mono.

  2. #2
    Viejo del Foro El Greco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Miami,Kendall
    Posts
    2,326

    Default Re: Volcan Pthh

    You've probably lost a couple of pounds with that walk
    Dios es Amor!

  3. #3
    Junkyard Dog randude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    PNW
    Posts
    3,148
    Blog Entries
    7

    Default Re: Volcan Pthh

    Sounds like you had fun. Wish you would share a photo or two, even if it is a phone pic or something. I have been using my phone as a cam all summer and it has been great, but lacking the zooming capabilities I need at times.

    Sorry about the sunburn.. those can be a drag if bad enough. Maybe some over the counter pain killers would be a good idea or some aloe.
    Survivor

  4. #4
    Para aquí para acá Jonh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    La Florida
    Posts
    16,362
    Blog Entries
    15

    Default Re: Volcan Pthh

    Mad dogs and Englishmen...

    My wife's grandfather loved "The Gods Must be Crazy."

  5. #5
    House SOB Little Corn Tom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pompano Beach, Florida
    Posts
    9,969
    Blog Entries
    5

    Default Re: Volcan Pthh

    Is that the one about the indigenous tribe that worshiped airplanes?
    Life's different here ... It's a whole 'nother pace.

  6. #6
    Active TRN Member StickMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Ohio, USA
    Posts
    468
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: Volcan Pthh

    I thought the premise of The Gods Must Be Crazy was that a coke bottle was dropped from an airplane and locals, not having ever seen one before, thought it was from God but after all the trouble it caused, a tribesman took it to the "edge of the world" to give it back to God?

    As for Volcano Masaya, it seems to be a tourist destination for us every year. (Last year, I took a nap on the bus at the top while others walked around the crater for the umpeenth time.) While it was cool the first few times I saw it, it has become not much more than a smoking hole in the ground any more.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    "Find out what it is in life that you don't do well - and then don't do that thing." -The most Interesting Man in the World

  7. #7

    Default Re: Volcan Pthh

    I've been roasted a couple time down there and I'd recommend buying a small thing of Zepoyl. Really helps cool down the burn, actually works so well I brought another one back home. Its a menthol rub so the scent might scare the ladies off.

  8. #8
    Para aquí para acá Jonh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    La Florida
    Posts
    16,362
    Blog Entries
    15

    Default Re: Volcan Pthh

    Quote Originally Posted by Little Corn Tom View Post
    Is that the one about the indigenous tribe that worshiped airplanes?
    Coke bottle, yeah. I saw it again recently, it's still funny and the girl is still cute. Many many parallels to Nicaragua, too.

    Only time I went to Volcan Masaya was 1998 and they let people roam freely up to the crater and stay as long as you wanted. I even carved our names in the fence along side dozens of other native carvings. I'm sure people have carved over them since.

  9. #9
    Junkyard Dog randude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    PNW
    Posts
    3,148
    Blog Entries
    7

    Default Re: Volcan Pthh

    I really liked that movie. It teaches us about being human. They called that old vehicle they used the anti Christ.

    Thanks for the valcon pics. The Dr stories stand on their own but I just wanted more because of of the subject matter. Everyone has a decent cam phone anymore.
    Survivor

Similar Threads

  1. Volcan Masaya
    By tresfrijoles in forum Nicaragua Scrapbook
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-20-2008, 12:27 PM
  2. Volcán Concepción
    By tresfrijoles in forum Nicaraguan Culture, Politics and History
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 12-20-2007, 06:40 PM
  3. Volcán El Concepción
    By tresfrijoles in forum Nicaraguan Culture, Politics and History
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 12-06-2007, 09:11 AM
  4. Volcán San Cristóbal: Ash and Gas
    By tresfrijoles in forum Nicaraguan Culture, Politics and History
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-14-2007, 01:05 PM
  5. Volcan Mombacho
    By tresfrijoles in forum Nicaragua Scrapbook
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 03-06-2007, 10:17 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Also visit the False Bluff Blog!