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Thread: Expats and Expats

  1. #51
    House SOB Little Corn Tom's Avatar
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    Default Re: Expats and Expats

    Quote Originally Posted by cookshow View Post
    The language of love. I don't know what she said but I sure like that she said it...............
    A sigh is a sigh in any language, eh?
    Life's different here ... It's a whole 'nother pace.

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    Dog Whisperer cookshow's Avatar
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    Default Re: Expats and Expats

    Quote Originally Posted by MizBrown View Post
    Here's the link to a story about another guy who had a similar idea: http://www.thebigclickmag.com/adulterer-bandsaw/



    Liked your story, but it was not band saw.

    I was here when it all went on and I think there is a lot that never got mentioned.

    Write a book on it, pay the parties a few hundred bucks to tell their stories. You will get your money back on that investment.
    ‎"You know what you say when people tell you you can't do something? Fool, shut your mouth up!"
    Ernie K Doe

  3. #53
    Viejo del Foro Just Plain John Wayne's Avatar
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    Default Re: Expats and Expats

    Quote Originally Posted by cookshow View Post
    The language of love. I don't know what she said but I sure like that she said it...............
    She's got Betty Davis Eyes....

    To learn Spanish for a man it is prudent to get a Walking dictionary and suck her tongue...
    To be called a "Has Been" I must surmise, is much Greater than to be called a "Nevah Been"... JW...



  4. #54
    The Bard of Jinotega MizBrown's Avatar
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    Default Re: Expats and Expats

    Quote Originally Posted by cookshow View Post
    Liked your story, but it was not band saw.

    I was here when it all went on and I think there is a lot that never got mentioned.

    Write a book on it, pay the parties a few hundred bucks to tell their stories. You will get your money back on that investment.
    Never really wanted to do true crime books since I really don't like talking to sociopaths. I'll talk to people who talked to them.

    One of the things that contributed to that story was hearing some Tea Party idiot on a mission whining about a Nicaraguan woman he'd fallen in lust with (and he had hardly better Spanish than I had at the time) whining about how the woman, who was part of a family that boarded him when he was on missions, telling him that she didn't love him. He was amazingly self-centered, and was here to help the Nicaraguan people.

    My reaction at the time was that the whiny guy was lucky the Nicaraguan woman who had to cope with his delusions hadn't been a bitch.

    I prefer fiction to reporting since with fiction, it has to be credible emotionally, not necessarily absolutely factually accurate. I like the band saw better than the chainsaw, meat to be processed.

    What I was playing with was not knowing where you are or what you're dealing with and trying to go through motions that would work if you were in some other place with people from a different culture. There's also a classic adulterous affair epiphany story common in academic circles that I was also playing off of -- where the narrator has an affair and it ends in some bittersweet way that psychologically enriches both parties, and he remembers her with great fondness or something. My character was trying to imagine he was in a different story than the one he was in.

    Obviously based on the story we all know about, but I took liberties. Says fiction on the label.

    To the best of my knowledge, there was no cynical friend, either.

  5. #55
    Dog Whisperer cookshow's Avatar
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    Default Re: Expats and Expats

    Time to time I still wonder about that whole thing, there is a lot more to that story. When the wife started looking him her story kept changing. The story line would make a interesting book. Exotic local, forbidden "love", violent murder. Now that I am thinking about it, might have seen it on TV last night.
    ‎"You know what you say when people tell you you can't do something? Fool, shut your mouth up!"
    Ernie K Doe

  6. #56
    The Bard of Jinotega MizBrown's Avatar
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    Default Re: Expats and Expats

    Quote Originally Posted by cookshow View Post
    Time to time I still wonder about that whole thing, there is a lot more to that story. When the wife started looking him her story kept changing. The story line would make a interesting book. Exotic local, forbidden "love", violent murder. Now that I am thinking about it, might have seen it on TV last night.
    The best true crime book I've ever read was Jerry Bledsoe's BITTER BLOOD was about two sociopaths who found each other and started eliminating family that didn't agree with them. One of the sociopaths was politically connected; the other was the son of a quack doctor who diagnosed and cured impossible things. Bledsoe was very familiar with North Carolina -- born there, not an exotic location for him. The idea that exotic location and customs will make a writer interesting is not anything I believe. I think a gringo would have to speak Spanish very well and would have to have lived here for maybe a decade or more to write a good book set in Nicaragua for a Latin American audience. If for the US, exotic location books are tourism by proxy and tourism is cheap these days. And most tourist destinations are stage sets and actors, not the real life of the country or the city. The tourist pays to be entertained. Live in a place until the people around you are just normal people going about their lives without paying much attention to the random gringos in their midst. Then, maybe a gringo can have something to say beyond "Oh, wow, exotic people who are exotic in exotic landscapes."

    Money in writing is generally less than most civilians imagine: 60,000 mass market paperbacks or 10,000 hardcovers equals $20K to 30K. Lot of people in writing make about what a mill hand makes. Basically, we sharecrop with the publisher on thirds, only we get an advance that we don't have to pay back.

  7. #57

    Default Re: Expats and Expats

    Quote Originally Posted by Just Plain John Wayne View Post
    She's got Betty Davis Eyes....

    To learn Spanish for a man it is prudent to get a Walking dictionary and suck her tongue...

    Walking Dictionary? A variation on the theme. Quite a good movie, too, but you only have to watch the first ten minutes to get an idea of where it's going. With that level of motivation I would quickly be a fluent Spanish speaker. More language lessons at 23:00

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ysRFgx1Hfrc


    Pic of the water buffalo pulling the car: priceless.

    Last edited by KeyWestPirate; 06-07-2014 at 01:15 PM.

  8. #58
    Active TRN Member RGV AG's Avatar
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    Default Re: Expats and Expats

    I don't know how to do one of those blog things on this site, so I will add this here as this thread had some go to it for a while. Don't think I should start something of my own, it could probably be used against me at some later point.

    Mizbrown,The Oracle of TRN, touched some soft spots in me when she mentioned several locales in North Carolina, the fine home of JPJW, which at one time was a leader in the world Textile industry. A lot of folks world wide don't realize that for about 60 or 70 years the US was home to the most vibrant, productive, and largest textile industry in the world. In particular in the time right after the migration of the mills and such from the North East and New England areas began and the development of the Southern Textile Industry began, the US was a world behemoth in this field. As late as the 1960’s there were more people employed in the Textile and Apparel industries in the US, actually into the 70’s as well, than there were people employed in the Automotive industry. Yet as went GM so did the US.

    I ended up in the apparel industry by an odd circumstance and chance. I worked for a small manufacturing company, home furnishings non-textile related, coming out of college. The position I had been in was basically to be moved to Dallas, I was on the border in Rio Grande Valley (hence the RGV in my handle) and didn’t really want to move to Dallas, way too cold, too many gringo’s, and a long way from a beach. Basically through my whole life, save for short stints, I have always been close to or in Mexico or other Latin American countries. San Antonio is basically a foreign country to me. The position that I had, which kept me in and around in Mexico was ending and I was kinda looking for another job, although I had been thinking about retiring at 24 if I could have figured it out.

    In the previous weeks I had spoken to an old friend of mine who was then working for a recruiting agency or headhunter about possibly looking but I was not looking too hard. This was all circa 1992/3 or so, before email and scanners and what not, so I had dropped my, very brief at the time, resume by her office and never paid it much never mind again. Well I get back home on a Friday evening after a week in Mexico, I was living on South Padre Island as the time in a carefree bachelor type way, good times but I digress, and check my message machine and I have about 4-5 messages from her to call her immediately, as soon as I can, so on and so forth. Too late then and besides I had bars to visit and dirty legs to chase. Well on Monday morning I gave her a call and she basically tells me if I could help her out by going to an interview for her, as she had submitted my resume to a company out of Waco, Texas that had a recently opened manufacturing facility in Mexico, she was not sure what they did, and that they had requested to interview me. Who’ed thunk that.

    So I say sure, why not, but I was not really thinking I would get the job as it was a bit vague and I was doing planning and scheduling and import/export work at the time. But this was all at the cusp of the NAFTA, and if you had a degree, a pulse, and could speak English and Spanish there were opportunities. So anyway, I go to the interview and it was at a Holiday Inn in McAllen, Texas. I sit in the waiting area and a gentleman comes down and calls me out and introduces himself. He asks if it is OK if we do the interview in his room, as he has a small suite from which to operate, that is fine with me and off we go. Well as he seats himself on the sofa he pulls out a can of Copenhagen Snuff and proceeds to take, as Walt Garrison would say “a pinch between the cheek and gum”, he then asks me if I mind if he has a beer and offers me one. Now we are talking…….

    So, long story short, I pull out my can of snuff, out of my sock mind you as I wanted to be discreet and my boots hid it from view, and I grab a beer and about 30 minutes later I accept a job with this apparel manufacturer out of Waco, Texas to help them with the processes, which I know nothing about, in their new Mexican manufacturing facility that is basically next door to both the butthole and end of the world. But first I end up in Waco, Texas for a few months learning the ins and outs of the business, hell I was as mixed up as the little boy that dropped his chewing gum in the chicken coop, as best I could. This companies objective was to have an “offshore” manufacturing facility due to customer pressure for lower prices while maintaining their US facility, that was basically 22 years old, open as best they could. They felt that they could do this if they got real good at it.

    I spent several months trying to learn what I could, but it was my introduction to what the Textile/Apparel Industry in the US had become, where it came from, and what was to happen to it. The industry was one that was dominated by women workers, many of them single mothers with little if any education, and those that truly were happy to provide what is really a day’s work for low wages. The industry had basically been under assault for years due to imports and rising US costs and the one hidden factor, that is never much discussed, of US retailers becoming huge buying giants that demanded, and could then force, rising and guaranteed profit margins. All of this, in the end, was placed upon the back of the American Textile/Apparel worker so that consumers could basically have disposable, cheap garments while retailers made a fortune selling them.

    Throughout the south and southwest many companies, those supposed exploiters of poor Norma Rae, fought a valiant fight to keep operations in the US, but in the end Mexican, Central American, and Chinese wages could not be defeated, much less ignored. As the industry grew offshore of the US I got to see many things, plant closings, businesses auctioned off, repossessions and creditor interventions. All really sad. One of the things that stuck in my mind was going to Olanta, South Carolina to buy equipment at liquidation auction of a company called Kingstree Knits a few years later in my career. The plant had employed about 600 local people in a poor area of South Carolina for years and as the auction progressed, we were buying sewing machines and cutting tables and such for shipment south, it passed through the office/breakroom area and in there, posted on one of the walls, were basically what looked like class pictures. Out of curiosity, as I was about auctioned out, I started looking at these pictures. I believe they started in 1949 and ran through 1996, and what they were was a picture history of all the employees, just like a class picture, once a year. All those years, and all those people and now here we were buying off the tools and accouterments that had provided a life stream for a community. Over the years I have seen the scene mentioned above repeated over and over, and in several countries.

    I guess the gist to this whole tale is don’t drink beer and dip snuff at an unintended job interview or you will end up in Nicaragua. I have had some interesting experiences in the rag business in many countries, and more than a few in Nicaragua. But that is a tale unto itself.

  9. #59
    House SOB Little Corn Tom's Avatar
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    Default Re: Expats and Expats

    Quote Originally Posted by RGV AG View Post
    I guess the gist to this whole tale is don’t drink beer and dip snuff at an unintended job interview or you will end up in Nicaragua. I have had some interesting experiences in the rag business in many countries, and more than a few in Nicaragua. But that is a tale unto itself.
    Hell of a post!

    Can't wait for that tale.
    Life's different here ... It's a whole 'nother pace.

  10. #60

    Default Re: Expats and Expats

    Agreed, excellent story. That's a helluva competitive industry.

  11. #61
    Viejo del Foro Just Plain John Wayne's Avatar
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    Default Re: Expats and Expats

    Don't go and get "Cotton Mouth" on us...

    Just pick a time and happening and do it with your uasual GUSTO....

    We are ALL Ears....
    To be called a "Has Been" I must surmise, is much Greater than to be called a "Nevah Been"... JW...



  12. #62
    Viejo del Foro Daddy-YO's Avatar
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    Default Re: Expats and Expats

    Hey Aggie, a question: if ya drink a beer while gumming a pinch of snuff, what's to prevent ya from swallowing the plug? And once swallowed doesn't it reconfigure your intestinal flora, or make ya take a job in a dying industry? An enquiring mind wants to know.

    Another: were you in Waco when the Branch Davidians got rolled over?

    I worked in a knitting mill, a non-descript, no windows concrete block box filled with whirling, stabbing machines and lint. Got minimum wage - a big step up from the prior two summers picking peaches. (That was truly hell, but I didn't know any better.) At the mill I learned that the same sweaters had ritzy & cheapo labels sewn on their collars. After graduation I had an interview with Milliken headquarters in SC - an unbelievable red-carpet treatment.

    RGV, don't feel bad about witnessing a community based on one industry die. Think of Detroit (& Camden, NJ). I understand that Diego Rivera painted a mural there (by invitation) with some strongly anti-capitalistic messages that the city is looking to sell or destroy.
    I never met a Semite I didn't like.

  13. #63
    Active TRN Member RGV AG's Avatar
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    Default Re: Expats and Expats

    Daddy Yo:

    Well gotta know how to do it.....I am a spitter, lots of snuff dippers swallow. I only swallow in church or in class, neither of which I attend regularly any more. I tell you what, growing up in Texas and attending Texas A&M will make you a believer in drinking Miller High Life .

    Milliken was and still basically is a first class outfit, those folks know their business. They, like most other major and still existing US Textile companies, have greatly reduced their dependence or presence in apparel fabrics. MizBrown may know the company that had the whole company town and mill there in NC, and it was full blown deal, and that is all gone now. The US Textils mills focus on specialty and odd fabrics and fibers, the only way they can survive.

    The industry is not glamorous or high paying, but it is like the mafia, once you get in it is kinda hard to get out. And it is what I call a "benign" industry in that most of the people in it are good, salt of the earth people. Doesn't matter what country, you find people that will work in this business.

    Oh, and no I was not in Waco when the Branch Davidians went up. I was there before and after, but not during the mess. What is truly sad about that is that there was absolutely no reason for that to have happened. That dude Koresh went running like every day down the roads and such, they could have popped him at any time. Also, some of the kids left the compound at times, why not wait till the kids were out. Koresh also went to many businesses, and folks around there did not have any problems with him or the cult. Whenever I think of that, my tinfoil hat, which is ever present, comes right out onto my head.

  14. #64
    Active TRN Member RGV AG's Avatar
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    Default Re: Expats and Expats

    I will relate to you all one of the funnier, or maybe I should say symbolic, experiences I had in this racket. I was working in Mexico at the plant that was close to end of the earth, I might have been there two or so years at this point and the facility had grown quite a bit. I had actually been promoted to Plant Manager, well they fired the other guy and couldn't find anyone else so it rolled to me.....

    Anyway, we had grown that particular facility to about 250 or so employees and were doing pretty good. We had expanded manufacturing into what had been strictly warehouse space before, this was in an old grain storage building and when it was hot it was scalding and when it was cold it was freezing. Well the newer manufacturing space was up near part of the fence and office areas, think of an L shaped layout if you will with the bottom of the L being the office and and union of the two lines that being the entrance to both areas.

    Well on a really hot day we had opened these large rolling metal doors to get some ventilation, and when we did that we usually had employees that either snuck out or entered and exited through the large openings instead of using the main entry ways where we had controlled access and such. On this particular fine day the plant was in a major rush to make a shipment and it was "all hands on deck" or "man your battle stations" depending of which part of the process the employee was in. I was making my way back into the new production area, in a heated rush no doubt, when I look just to my right and spy a young woman milling about like she was taking a stroll.

    This situation galled me as how could this girl not know that the entire fate of the company likely depended on her shaking her butt and getting some work done until her little brown fingers bled. In my youthful 20's something exuberance and quest for making my bones as Gorilla of production I walk right up to her and ask her "what the hell are you doing out here" "surely you know you are not supposed to exit via those doors and come with me right now". I take off in a huff with her in tow and take her back to the finishing department where I believe she is from, why I am not sure, and yell for the supervisor to "come here right now". I lay into that woman and go up and back down the riot act and explain, for what is likely the 18th time that week, the dire importance of meeting shipping dates and delivery and quality and yankee ingenuity and why the Germans bombed Pearl Harbor and we had not a minute to spare and so on and so forth. I finish my fine spiel with in a tone that would have made any fan of The Gipper proud and few Mexican Spanish attagirls and turn on my heel and leave.

    A few minutes later I walk past the section and I see the young girl diligently folding sweat pants, all is right with the world. Or at least I thought so.

    About 30 minutes later the Production Manager comes into the office and gives me the 45 year old woman to the 27 year old Aggie "come here with the finger motion". Ok. So I got out to talk to her and she proceeds to tell me: "You know that young girl you just took back to the finishing area and put to work?" Me: "why yes, yes I do" and as I try to start extolling the path of my moments previous victory she informs me: "Well she is 12 years old and was her dropping off lunch for her mother" "and your dumb ass grabbed and took her into the plant, they were trying to tell you this but you wouldn't let anyone else talk". Oops.

    Live and learn I guess.....

  15. #65
    TRN's fiesty redhead catahoula fan's Avatar
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    Default Re: Expats and Expats

    Funny, Ike!
    "Patience is a virtue, but persistence to the point of success is a blessing."

  16. #66
    Para aquí para acá Jonh's Avatar
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    Default Re: Expats and Expats

    So… did you hire her?

  17. #67
    House SOB Little Corn Tom's Avatar
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    Default Re: Expats and Expats

    Great story, Jefe!
    Life's different here ... It's a whole 'nother pace.

  18. #68
    Active TRN Member RGV AG's Avatar
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    Default Re: Expats and Expats

    No, we did not hire her. Thank you all for the kind words....

    Do you all realize history was made today? Oscar Duarte, who was born in Masaya, Nicaragua scored Costa Rica's 2nd goal in the 3-1 major upset victory of the Uruguays by the Tico's. He is the first Nicaraguan to ever score a goal in World Cup history. This is a major deal.....

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    House SOB Little Corn Tom's Avatar
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    Default Re: Expats and Expats

    That one slipped right by me.....
    Life's different here ... It's a whole 'nother pace.

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    Dog Whisperer cookshow's Avatar
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    Default Re: Expats and Expats

    Quote Originally Posted by Daddy-YO View Post
    H
    Another: were you in Waco when the Branch Davidians got rolled over?
    The time when that hit I had some dealings with a company out of Waco, Guy had cows near the compound and could not get out to check them for a good bit. We always referred to the guys we worked with as the Whackos in Waco, Koresh gave that a new meaning.
    ‎"You know what you say when people tell you you can't do something? Fool, shut your mouth up!"
    Ernie K Doe

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    Viejo del Foro Daddy-YO's Avatar
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    Default Re: Expats and Expats

    Quote Originally Posted by RGV AG View Post
    not in Waco when the Branch Davidians went up. I was there before and after, but not during the mess. What is truly sad about that is that there was absolutely no reason for that to have happened. That dude Koresh went running like every day down the roads and such, they could have popped him at any time. Also, some of the kids left the compound at times, why not wait till the kids were out. Koresh also went to many businesses, and folks around there did not have any problems with him or the cult. Whenever I think of that, my tinfoil hat, which is ever present, comes right out onto my head.
    Quote Originally Posted by cookshow View Post
    The time when that hit I had some dealings with a company out of Waco, ... We always referred to the guys we worked with as the Whackos in Waco, Koresh gave that a new meaning.
    It seemed to me the government's reaction was whacko. Others too. It spawned the first ugly homegrown terrorist act of this era: the OK City bombing in 1995. I recall airports were sealed looking for Arabs trying to leave the country at the time. Timothy McVeigh was executed in 2001 for the crime - on the 11th of June, exactly 3 months before a band of suicidal Arabs took down the NYC Trade Towers with our planes. Just saying.
    I never met a Semite I didn't like.

  22. #72
    Junkyard Dog randude's Avatar
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    Default Re: Expats and Expats

    I have been gone, and time flies fast. Trying to make my way in the USA instead of leaving. I just found that it would cost me more to live the way I wanted in CA than NA. Moving out was Mostly about cost and partly about running away from a country run amok. We are all on camera so many times per day, all connected and tracked on the computer, and scanners identify us to the police as we are driving by.

    I will just move to Southern Costal Oregon one day and that is close enough for me.
    Survivor

  23. #73
    Viejo del Foro Daddy-YO's Avatar
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    Default Re: Expats and Expats

    Quote Originally Posted by randude View Post
    Moving out was ... partly about running away from a country run amok. We are all on camera so many times per day, all connected and tracked on the computer, and scanners identify us to the police as we are driving by.
    Welcome back to the virtually Real Nicaragua!

    All of the amok stuff you describe happens here in Nicaragua, but on a local scale, non-electronically. People will stare at you on the street as though you were a giraffe in cargo shorts. And everyone in the neighborhood knows your business (& intimacies of your life) the old fashion way, gossip.

    And the Poli-Poli scan with 20/20 or better vision, see you're a gringo and pull you over to take a bite out of your too fat (by Nica standards) wallet.
    I never met a Semite I didn't like.

  24. #74
    Viejo del Foro bikingo's Avatar
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    Default Re: Expats and Expats

    Quote Originally Posted by Daddy-YO View Post
    Welcome back to the virtually Real Nicaragua!

    All of the amok stuff you describe happens here in Nicaragua, but on a local scale, non-electronically. People will stare at you on the street as though you were a giraffe in cargo shorts. And everyone in the neighborhood knows your business (& intimacies of your life) the old fashion way, gossip.

    And the Poli-Poli scan with 20/20 or better vision, see you're a gringo and pull you over to take a bite out of your too fat (by Nica standards) wallet.
    Exactly they don't need no stinking technology. The bicycle rocking chair grapevine travels at the speed of light. Chismes in a nanosecond

  25. #75
    The Bard of Jinotega MizBrown's Avatar
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    Default Re: Expats and Expats

    Quote Originally Posted by bikingo View Post
    Exactly they don't need no stinking technology. The bicycle rocking chair grapevine travels at the speed of light. Chismes in a nanosecond
    Cell phones are in the mix now, too. I've had one friend tell me that I was seen on the bus going to Matagalpa earlier in the week. Everyone has a cell phone, even if all of them don't have enough credit on it to make a call.Fastest way to get in touch with my landlord is by Facebook.

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