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Thread: Wawashang

  1. #1
    Dog Whisperer cookshow's Avatar
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    Default Wawashang

    Early in July I visited an amazing place, Wawashang (pronounced Wawashan), a 2 hour boat ride North of Bluefields. Wawashang is a huge nature preserve but that was not my interest, it is also a huge test farm with dozens of varieties of food bearing trees. The farm has both an agricultural and carpentry school onsite and youth live on the farm while attending classes, at the time I was there it was school vacation so no kids around but I did get to tour the carpentry workshop and see some of their works in progress.

    Long as I have been in Nicaragua I had heard rumor of such a place, finally took some detective work to put together the puzzle and actually get the facts about the farm and setting up the visit.

    The farm is run by a group called Fadcanic (Google Fadcanic Wawashang and you can learn more). Through Fadcanic's office in Bluefields I was able to learn boat schedules and set up a visit and farm tour. The farm has a basic guesthouse, rooms with bunkbeds, shared bathrooms downstairs from the rooms. Food is served in a "mess hall" at set hours.

    Stepped off the boat, was met by the farm manager, dumped my bag, put on my rubber boots and my tour began. My main objective for the trip was to procure 2 particular varieties of Coconut, I had been told conflicting stories, the Farm told me they had them available, the office in Bluefields said not available, had to go see for myself. Was able to find the Coconut I was hunting and in sufficient quantity.

    The Farm has countless varieties of Coconut, over a dz varieties of Cacao, 6 varieties of Breadfruit (4 imported from Hawaii), All sorts of fruits, some I knew, some I had never heard of. Even got to see Black Pepper growing.

    Wawashang produces all sorts of products from their Farm, obviously Coconut Oil is made, and they have at least 2 oil operations, one is artisinal, the other more mechanized. They have huge wood burning and solar dryers, drying everything from Cacao to Ginger. They make Jellies and Jams, all sorts of things that they sell all over the Country, if you are in Bluefields they have a small retail outlet on the corner of the street leading into the Mercado, check them out.

    Further up the River Fadcanic operates another large Preserve. Saw lots of bird life while on my tour and even a deer, I think they do have guides to take people further in the Bush to view wildlife and such.

    For someone interested in Agriculture and Wildlife it might be worth a trip. I would have to look at my notes but it seems like the boat ride was around $10 each way, the hotel was $6nt or so and food was $2 a meal or so (really basic food).
    ‎"You know what you say when people tell you you can't do something? Fool, shut your mouth up!"
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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Wawashang

    Hope to get up there soon, especially with the info you've shared. Do you remember by any chance whether one of their trees for sale is rosewood?

  3. #3
    House SOB Little Corn Tom's Avatar
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    Default Re: Wawashang

    An NGO that is actually doing some good?

    Amazing.

    Sounds like skill sets the area needs too!
    Life's different here ... It's a whole 'nother pace.

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    Dog Whisperer cookshow's Avatar
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    Default Re: Wawashang

    Only saw Food Bearing trees, I will ask about exotics but doubt they have any as it never came up during my time there and we looked at lots of trees.I know there are people on the Coast in search of Rosewood and I hear the permit process to harvest and export can be complicated.Personally I would be reluctant to plant any kind of precious wood tree if the hope is to someday harvest and sell it. Crazy as it may seem you may be forbidden to harvest a tree you planted. I would find someone that actually knows, Dud up in Alimakamba may have a good idea, I really don't know anything but have heard all sorts of crazy stories, mostly from a guy that was helping some foreigners locate Rosewood along the Coast. I have not run across any NGO involved with Precious woods but there probably is one (or more). There was (is) a tree NGO in Jinotepe many years ago, Melissa may know if they are still there. I think Trees for Life is in Nica.The only Precious woods I have seen in seedling form are Teak, sure there are others I just never have looked.
    ‎"You know what you say when people tell you you can't do something? Fool, shut your mouth up!"
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  5. #5
    Active TRN Member RGV AG's Avatar
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    Default Re: Wawashang

    Cookshow:
    Good info, thanks for that information that is really interesting.

    LCT: Well said about the NGO's. Good for them.

  6. #6
    The Bard of Jinotega MizBrown's Avatar
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    Default Re: Wawashang

    Quote Originally Posted by cookshow View Post
    The only Precious woods I have seen in seedling form are Teak, sure there are others I just never have looked.
    I've had someone point out ebony plantations in the Rivas area and maybe on Ometepe, grown for veneer.

    My tank stands are what's called oak locally which I've been told is rosewood.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Wawashang

    Kevin, thanks. Good thots. I'll keep you posted on what I learn about rosewood.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Wawashang

    Quote Originally Posted by ann View Post
    Kevin, thanks. Good thots. I'll keep you posted on what I learn about rosewood.
    >>>> Does anyone have a pic of "rosewood"?

    Hardwood in general is referred to as "madera de color". I have some furniture made from guanacaste and cedro... A little bit of good wood goes a long way. I buy it whenever the opportunity presents itself. I really need to find some type of larger bandsaw to reduce it to usable dimensions.

    Most of the north was heavily logged, it's made a big difference in how the soil can retain moisture. Driving into San Juan del Norte from the logged area is like going from night to day. Even the air is different. A few places that were difficult to get to were spared.

    I'm going to RobreDalito tomorrow, 45 minute walk after we leave the road in San Jeronimo (which is remote enough as it is). There might be something left there.

    Ariana describes RobreDalito as "feo, muy feo. El inferno" but she has some bad memories growing up there. The community supports 87 families, no electricity (although a few have solar and television), no pulperia, but more important to a Nica than food: a MoviStar signal.
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    Default Re: Wawashang

    I'm unsure of the variety of rosewood that grows in Nicaragu.

    Indian rosewood



    Rosewood in bloom...am told by a craftsman in Bluefields that this tree in bloom is highly visible from the air earlier in the year. I think this is Brazilian rosewood


  10. #10
    Para aquí para acá Jonh's Avatar
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    Default Re: Wawashang

    Guitar fingerboards!

    That's a spectacular tree.

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