View Poll Results: Why did you move to Nicaragua?

Voters
18. You may not vote on this poll
  • I moved here to live

    10 55.56%
  • I moved here to die

    3 16.67%
  • I moved here to escape the law

    1 5.56%
  • I don't know, I just ended up here.

    4 22.22%
  • Some other reason

    7 38.89%
Multiple Choice Poll.
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 48

Thread: Poll: Why are you in Nicaragua?

  1. #1
    Para aquí para acá Jonh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    La Florida
    Posts
    15,101
    Blog Entries
    15

    Default Poll: Why are you in Nicaragua?

    As I pass the half-century mark, thoughts of old age and retirement (or non-retirement) cross my mind more often and in a different light. I had always wanted to live in Nicaragua to take advantage of the simpler life, lower cost of living, and generally pleasant people. When the current government began I set that aside. I can live simple and cheap in America if I really wanted to, and not put up with the petty thieving, language issues, and being treated as a second class citizen for being a gringo by the people that don't seem as generally pleasant as they once did.

    The other day the subject came up, and my wife still thinks she wants us to move to Nicaragua when the kids are out of school. "And do what?" I asked. She thinks social security will be plenty to live on. I don't. Not at the comfort level she expects. It's not like it was in the '80s when her family left. And I'm not very good at doing "nothing."

    I could go live there to eat rice and beans, drink my morning coffee, and watch the world go by, as I await my soul's departure from my body, but I just don't see living in Nicaragua to earn a living, put kids through college, and do interesting activities. So it comes down to two choices. Do I move to Nicaragua to live, or move there to die?

    Which is your choice? I know what some of you have chosen.

  2. #2
    TRN Science officer bill_bly_ca's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    North of the border, south of the artic Circle (Ontario)
    Posts
    5,143
    Blog Entries
    5

    Default Re: Poll: Why are you in Nicaragua?

    I just ended up here, by fault of Marriage.... (Or there - soon to be new here)

    Within 18 months I (we?) too (two?) will be at the 1/2 century mark as well.

    At 55 is when we will take the plunge to have "Our" time.

    Yes we will still work, possibly into our early 80's, god willing. People forget that when the age of 65 was chosen for retirement the majority did not reach 65. I bet you will see the age of retirement creep up to 75 over the next 20 or so years.

    Most of the well paying work is to be done in Canada. Nica time will probably be public service and/or small business. Maybe enough will be generated by the 5 to 6 extra rooms we plan to let out. Maybe the beer brewing will work out. Brother in law showed how a few thousand in simple investment can generate some income. Brought all of his worldly goods down via straight truck. Including 2 cars. Now the contracting out of the truck and renting out of the Cars gives him a nice cherry on top of his LTD..

    Never did have disillusions about living the brochure of champaign kisses and caviare dreams in retirement. That was a product of the industry of retirement and the baby boomer generation.
    Last edited by bill_bly_ca; 09-22-2014 at 12:09 PM.
    ==================================================
    Dude !!!.... Its a Canal !!! Can you Dig it ??

  3. #3
    Viejo del Foro Daddy-YO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Philly - León
    Posts
    1,362
    Blog Entries
    6

    Default Re: Poll: Why are you in Nicaragua?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jonh View Post
    So it comes down to two choices. Do I move to Nicaragua to live, or move there to die?
    Or to be born again . . ?

    At first I thought you were borrowing a page from Fydel's website play book. But then I saw the poll choice, "to escape the law" - now that's some good TRN humor. (Unless you meant escaping the in-laws?) Still, I'll ignore your attempt at demographics - as i did all of fyl's polls - and just tell you.

    1, Like Bill_Bly_CA I married Nicaragua. She's a sweetheart, but I'm having trouble digesting the whole package, namely, kids (the older ones & those abandoned by her older sister), and mother- & brothers- & sisters-in-law. At times, all is hunky-dory

    2, I can afford Nicaragua. Life is simple & savory.

    3, I don't do nothing. I'm into all those things I thought about doing while working, but work demanded too much of me to allow anything beyond leisure activities. And I sure enjoy the easy pace of living.
    "Lord, let me live until I die." - Will Rogers

  4. #4

    Default Re: Poll: Why are you in Nicaragua?

    I think that we should be able to pick more than one ...


    "And do what?" I asked.

    Big cultural differences here. Nica's CAN do nothing all day, and make a life of it. Endless platicar, mostly gossip. TV. Just getting through the day takes an effort, especially for the women. Cooking, household work withought applicances is time consuming. The phone consumes 25% of the average Nica's waking hour. It;s the first thing you hear in the morning, and the last before you fall asleep.

    Less plesant: Nicas know without endless Fox News commentary that their country is changing, and possibly NOT in their best interest. The hordes of Chinese will change the face of Nicaragua. It will be interesting to see: a swath of Nica-Chinese along the canal path.

    You can live cheaper in Nicaragua, but once you begin to crave the amenities that you left behind, the price goes up.

    I have to stay busy. It doesn't matter what I do, it's just important that I have an on-going focus.


    " She's a sweetheart, but I'm having trouble digesting the whole package, namely, kids (the older ones & those abandoned by her older sister), and mother- & brothers- & sisters-in-law. At times, all is hunky-dory . ."

    I'm beginning to understand that this is the best part (although a distraction from business). These are some fascinating people in their own right, getting to know them, getting drunk with them, appreciating what their lives involve, has significantly enriched mine.

    Ariana's father took a bullet fragment in his eye fighting the contras, finally got a trip to Venezuela to get it removed a few years back. As I get closer, I feel acceptance, much as they unconditionally accept all the oddballs, drunks and criminals in THEIR family. My trip to RobleDalito with Ariana was complicated. A small, isolated community at 6000 feet, with 87 families.

    My Spanish has to get better, and they talk funny in the campo, drop "s" from ends of words.

    I envy the ones who have married into the culture. Despite the aggravation there must be a real sense of belonging that develops over time. At this point in my life, there is nowhere else I would rather be.




    Last edited by KeyWestPirate; 09-22-2014 at 10:11 AM.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Poll: Why are you in Nicaragua?

    ?It seemed like a good idea at the time?

  6. #6
    Para aquí para acá Jonh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    La Florida
    Posts
    15,101
    Blog Entries
    15

    Default Re: Poll: Why are you in Nicaragua?

    "To escape the law" isn't a joke, except that no one in their right mind would admit it. Oh, and you can do multiple choice in the poll.

    I don't have illusions of "retirement." I don't understand why anyone would want to, except from a career of physically demanding work.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Poll: Why are you in Nicaragua?

    There is a good book to read...Younger Next Year...one aspect is to work...I have found it so much easier to start a new business here then in USA....so I can find out if any of my ideas are viable . And hate cold weather! Yes, many issues but, as an example I had idea for a coal fired generator as coal is shipped from Colombia to USA...right past NI...in two days had appointment with key government official in charge of all energy projects...Answer was NO, but he would approve any viable Hydro, wind, geothermal project that I presented..so many opportunities in energy, hospitality, gaming, minerals, water, coconuts, etc.....so little time

  8. #8

    Default Re: Poll: Why are you in Nicaragua?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jonh View Post
    "To escape the law" isn't a joke, except that no one in their right mind would admit it. Oh, and you can do multiple choice in the poll.

    I don't have illusions of "retirement." I don't understand why anyone would want to, except from a career of physically demanding work.
    I still have quite a few years before I could think about retirement but from what I see most people I work with that retire go downhill quickly. I think I prefer to have a 2nd career or maybe even a 3rd career and just skip retirement. If you enjoy what you are doing you never work a day in your life anyways. I enjoy outdoor activities and dislike cold weather. If the government tanks or the quality of life gets to low I'd probably look at other countries in Central America.

    Agreed and admit on escaping the law, the USA is quite litigious. We have moved to far from what is right and wrong into legislating what is good and bad.

    I'd be fine hopping back and forth from Nica to the USA. Hopefully I could find/make a bit of work in Nica during the cold months. I can always fish and farm if not.

  9. #9
    Para aquí para acá Jonh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    La Florida
    Posts
    15,101
    Blog Entries
    15

    Default Re: Poll: Why are you in Nicaragua?

    Quote Originally Posted by Playa Pete View Post
    There is a good book to read...Younger Next Year...one aspect is to work...I have found it so much easier to start a new business here then in USA....so I can find out if any of my ideas are viable . And hate cold weather! Yes, many issues but, as an example I had idea for a coal fired generator as coal is shipped from Colombia to USA...right past NI...in two days had appointment with key government official in charge of all energy projects...Answer was NO, but he would approve any viable Hydro, wind, geothermal project that I presented..so many opportunities in energy, hospitality, gaming, minerals, water, coconuts, etc.....so little time
    If it doesn't use Venezuelan oil or anything the government gets a kickback for, the answer will always be no.

    I'd like to do something productive that's not location-dependent, or dependent on government permission.

  10. #10
    TRN Science officer bill_bly_ca's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    North of the border, south of the artic Circle (Ontario)
    Posts
    5,143
    Blog Entries
    5

    Default Re: Poll: Why are you in Nicaragua?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jonh View Post
    I don't have illusions of "retirement." .

    La Chamuka's official Architect, Draftsman to the crown.
    ==================================================
    Dude !!!.... Its a Canal !!! Can you Dig it ??

  11. #11
    Viejo del Foro Just Plain John Wayne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Puerto Cabezas Nicar
    Posts
    13,263
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default Re: Poll: Why are you in Nicaragua?

    Quote Originally Posted by el duende grande View Post
    ?It seemed like a good idea at the time?
    I really like this one, it fits me as well...
    To be called a "Has Been" I must surmise, is much Greater than to be called a "Nevah Been"... JW...



  12. #12

    Default Re: Poll: Why are you in Nicaragua?

    Quote Originally Posted by Just Plain John Wayne View Post
    I really like this one, it fits me as well...

    Some of us could have checked all the boxes .. . . .

    Couple of other choices:

    I really like the cheap beer in Granada ----why would anyone live anywhere else?

    The girls from Carazo are HOT!

    I was going to Costa Rica but got on the wrong plane.

  13. #13
    Para aquí para acá Jonh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    La Florida
    Posts
    15,101
    Blog Entries
    15

    Default Re: Poll: Why are you in Nicaragua?

    Quote Originally Posted by bill_bly_ca View Post
    La Chamuka's official Architect, Draftsman to the crown.
    I've never designed an insane asylum, that might be an interesting challenge.

  14. #14

    Default Re: Poll: Why are you in Nicaragua?

    ``I was driving to New Zealand and my car broke down``
    That`s my story and I`m sticking to it.

  15. #15
    Viejo del Foro Daddy-YO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Philly - León
    Posts
    1,362
    Blog Entries
    6

    Default Re: Poll: Why are you in Nicaragua?

    Quote Originally Posted by kwah2249 View Post
    Agreed and admit on escaping the law, the USA is quite litigious. We have moved to far from what is right and wrong into legislating what is good and bad.
    Kwah's interpretation of moving to Nicaragua "to escape the law" brings up a key point about the difference between this part of the world and that part, namely, culture. Beyond, or maybe related to, the different language, it's a different way of thinking about society (& reality). Customs trump laws here. Police are less of a military force and more like guys out of Mayberry R.F.D. who know & interact casually with town folk. (Traffic cops are a tentative exception.)

    There are on average 4 lawyers for every 1,000 residents in the US. In Washington, D.C. that's 80 per 1,000 but, of course, most congressmen are lawyers (speaking of the semi-retired 'on the job').

    Perhaps it's because of the separation of church & state in the US that there are laws against an individual doing something in private that has no direct affect on any other. "It's bad for you." Seems like overreach to me.

    And then there's a whole different concept of what constitutes family, from oldest to youngest, and an individual member's responsibilities. It's a very old tradition that modern society has 'progressed' beyond, to a large degree.

    It's refreshing being among people who think so differently.
    "Lord, let me live until I die." - Will Rogers

  16. #16
    The Bard of Jinotega MizBrown's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Jinotega, Nicaragua
    Posts
    822
    Blog Entries
    29

    Default Re: Poll: Why are you in Nicaragua?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jonh View Post
    "To escape the law" isn't a joke, except that no one in their right mind would admit it. Oh, and you can do multiple choice in the poll.

    I don't have illusions of "retirement." I don't understand why anyone would want to, except from a career of physically demanding work.
    One of the guys on the International Falconry Forum said the worst day in retirement was better than the best day working.

    I can do things because I want to do them -- keep fish, take photographs, do whatever writing I can still do at my age. Just live. Haven't ever had a job that was as good as having enough money to live without one.

  17. #17

    Default Re: Poll: Why are you in Nicaragua?

    Quote Originally Posted by KeyWestPirate View Post

    You can live cheaper in Nicaragua, but once you begin to crave the amenities that you left behind, the price goes up.


    This is a really good point that i wish was posted across all messageboards and living abroad books, etc.
    If you cant live cheap in the states, you cant live cheap in Nicaragua. Sure when you first come its dirt cheap. But after a few months you get sick of riding the bus and want to get a vehicle, or maybe you want some hot water, and a washing machine. Or maybe you wanna put in air conditioning. Its stops being the vacation spot, and turns into real life, and you need to find a vacation spot, which costs money. etc. You stop loving the fritanga every night and splurge on apples, or TGIFridays in the city, etc. Or maybe its none of those things specifically....but eventually, something gets to you and you want a little more, a little better, a little nicer. and most of those things cost a premium here.
    And if you can continue to live on the cheap here, you are probably the type of person who can make do with anything, and live quite cheaply anywhere, including the USA.

  18. #18
    Viejo del Foro Daddy-YO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Philly - León
    Posts
    1,362
    Blog Entries
    6

    Default Re: Poll: Why are you in Nicaragua?

    It sounds like the remake-of-the-new-lover syndrome. When you lose the one true love of your life - for whatever reason - some tend to want to find or recreate the qualities of that true love in any new lovers. It's a big mistake.

    Ditto with expats that try to achieve that homeland experience - with all the amenities - whereever in the world they go.

    Love it for what it is, or leave it - to rephrase the old pro-Vietnam-War slogan.

    Too many gringos come to these strange lands seeking to remake all in conformity with their idea of 'modernity' and aren't comfortable with the simple pleasures, the stress-free easy-does-it style of living here in the tropics. Beware of measuring all by the capitalist yardstick 'cheap'. Come here prepared to rethink what life & living is all about.
    "Lord, let me live until I die." - Will Rogers

  19. #19
    The Bard of Jinotega MizBrown's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Jinotega, Nicaragua
    Posts
    822
    Blog Entries
    29

    Default Re: Poll: Why are you in Nicaragua?

    Quote Originally Posted by vinyljunkie77003 View Post
    This is a really good point that i wish was posted across all messageboards and living abroad books, etc.
    If you cant live cheap in the states, you cant live cheap in Nicaragua.
    And if you can continue to live on the cheap here, you are probably the type of person who can make do with anything, and live quite cheaply anywhere, including the USA.
    The attitude about being poor here is different than the attitude about being poor in the US. My brother said that a Mexican American friend said that in Mexico, nobody was ashamed of being poor, and that seems to be true here, too, even those who don't want to be poor and who are hustling to get something better.

    I think it's easier to live here as long as you avoid other gringos most of the time. . In the US, the artistic poor tend to be in a sub-culture of other, often flakey, people like them. Here, I can hang out with lawyers, hotel owners, and chat about my artistic blood with the local pharmacist. This is huge for me, but won't apply to everyone.

    The toys are more expensive -- a lens that would have cost $1,000 in the US with free shipping cost $1300 ish here. Plan to inherit some money for the toys. Plan to have a slush fund to replace them if they're stolen.

    What's really screwed things up for living cheap a lot of places is us coming in and paying semi-outrageous prices for houses. Before Lake Apanas Estates and a gringo or two who wanted something and were willing to pay nut-bar prices for things (in one case at least $100K over what anyone here was paying for similar houses), housing in Jinotega was cheaper. And if the landlord isn't particularly greedy, a small house is still five and not six figures. But not the four figures that people were paying in 2000 and earlier. Nicaraguans still get houses from family members for much less.

    My impression is that many of the people who bought at the high prices were not intending to live here, that the people with money who paid $29K for lots on Lake Apanas expected to flip them for even more. There's a hint of this with many people's moving to Nicaragua plans -- that they expect to make money from the deal.

    $12K a year here spends like $30K a year in the US -- but I think the best fit is living in a city, but that's generally not the fantasy for a lot of people looking for that place in the country, which can be way more expensive than the initial cost in stuff stolen, in having to supply a significant chunk of your own electricity and water, and with isolation from anyone who shares your interests (we've got pro photographers in Esteli and probably Matagalpa, a couple of serious aquarists, and some poets everywhere).

    I've been wondering if one problem for Americans is that they travel a lot without leaving resorts, and without learning a second or third language, so all the travels tend to be to places set up for mono-lingual Anglo-phone tourists, which isn't what it's like for most people in most countries (the only countries with a majority of people fluent in English are Sweden, Norway, and Denmark). I never did that kind of traveling, so I didn't have anything to expect. Looked like the Lower East Side -- been there, done that, could do it again. It's been better, much better. My idea for traveling now is to rent a room in someone's house and spend at least a month there.

    Treating home as the get away place doesn't work. When I lived in Manhattan, my get aways were weekend to week long bicycle trips out from town. When I lived in the DC area, I did day trips or weekend trips to the mountains. Here it's the overnighter to Managua or the day trip to Matagalpa.

    My advice to anyone here is find an interest you can do cheap here -- fish out of the local water are cheap; orchid and other plants you collect yourself are cheap -- or budget for one or two luxuries (for me cameras and the aquariums) that can be one off purchases (the tanks and gear, which aren't tremendously stealable) or things you don't have to replace often (cameras don't really have to be replaced every year or two or even five).

    Still have very little interest in a car or motorcycle, bought the $240 washing machine after doing clothes on the sink for more than two years, don't have hot water at my kitchen sink, and the house came with a electric shower head. Still don't have a full sized stove, just use a two burner gas stove top. Finally bought a TV but don't use it that much.

    The advantage here is that it is another culture, with different blind spots and strengths and weaknesses. If people aren't engaged in that, they might as well not move here.

    I have yet to splurge on apples. Pitayas, yes.

    I've been asked by a Chinese guy living in Nicaragua why I'm not in the capital. One thing about here (and about China and most of the world) is that the romance is in urban life. People who have money visit the country on weekends, and don't live there. Jinotega is around 60,000 people and has pretty much everything I need in town, walking distance for most of it. My combined TV/Internet/Cable and cell phone with a large data plan is around $75 a month. I could get that cheaper, but it's convenient having the data plan to spare and unlimited Claro to Claro calling, and as much Internet as possible. But that price is pretty much equal to what I was paying in the US for cable internet and phone (thought the TV cable is a very cheap add-on).

    One of my big suggestions is to check to see if you can get things here that matter to you first, and see what the prices will be. Jinotega for an aquarist is golden -- one of the best aquarium stores in the country (a hobbyist who keeps two stores as a sideline), reasonably consistent water supply in town, reasonably consistent electricity, and some interesting local fish. It's good for gardening. I haven't seen either a camera store or an arts supply place. And a replacement body for my micro 4/3rds system would require a mule or a trip back to the US (another reason to switch to Sony is that I can get something here and batteries and filters). Knitting yarns here are generally fingering weight and spun for crochet.

    Many people seem to have trouble imagining that a place might be voluntarily different from where they grew up.

    Most Americans live in the suburbs of cities or in smallish towns. There are very few parts of Nicaragua that resemble US suburbs. And if people find those, the price of gas is $6 a gallon.

    A lot of people from North America also move down for the cheap servants -- and have no real interest in seeing Nicaragua become a more prosperous place for Nicaraguans. The canal, for all the real problems with it, is a touchstone for determining which expats actually care about what happens to Nicaraguans and what makes Nicaraguan cheap enough for the expat couple bringing down $2K a year to have a maid and a gardener/driver, which they very much could not afford in the US.

    I hire people to do things for me that I can imagine someone actually likes doing. I've never met anyone who liked cleaning up after able-bodied adults and older children. And my mother had maids when I was growing up.

  20. #20

    Default Re: Poll: Why are you in Nicaragua?

    Quote Originally Posted by Daddy-YO View Post
    It sounds like the remake-of-the-new-lover syndrome. When you lose the one true love of your life - for whatever reason - some tend to want to find or recreate the qualities of that true love in any new lovers. It's a big mistake.

    Ditto with expats that try to achieve that homeland experience - with all the amenities - whereever in the world they go.

    Love it for what it is, or leave it - to rephrase the old pro-Vietnam-War slogan.

    Too many gringos come to these strange lands seeking to remake all in conformity with their idea of 'modernity' and aren't comfortable with the simple pleasures, the stress-free easy-does-it style of living here in the tropics. Beware of measuring all by the capitalist yardstick 'cheap'. Come here prepared to rethink what life & living is all about.

    The life here REALLY becomes interesting when you become part of a Nica family. That's a normal progression for many . . . a reason many are here

    Beyond the family, you have the tribe .. .I have a new maid, which I wound up with when Ariana decided she didn't like Marta (heart of gold, dumb as a post, didn't iron). In truth the new maid is excellent. Intelligent, conscientious, lives closeby. She came to me last week asking for hangers, I said we have plenty, but she was re-washing all my t-shirts and ironing them, after she had run out of regular shirts, and was putting them on hangers. You should see my closet!!

    In truth, it was less Marta than the new girl is from RobleDalito, Ariana's little community in the mountains, and hence, part of the extended family. Ariana made the argument (among others) that Nuria didn't have a husband (Marta does, but I'm not sure what he adds), but did have three kids, one little girl who's only a year and has an on-going respiratory problem. And, they grew up together.


    So, all of my clothing got re-washed while I was in the US ... (again, Marta would let it sit in the washer, and it doesn't take long here to pick up an odor); everything got re-ironed. It's GREAT to put on fresh, ironed clothes. This has to be one of the best things about living in Nicaragua; but finding the right people is difficult.

    To the point of my family story:

    I arrived to find Francisco, Roberto, and Marvin occupying my house. These are respectively, Ariana's father, mother, and brother. Marvin has a drinking problem, and he finally collapsed with what was diagnosed by the public hospital in Condega as a failing heart. However, Condega has no EKG capability, so they all trouped to Estelí for the EKG. There wasn't anyone in Estelí (public health service) who could read the EKG, and when he returned to Condega with the strip of paper, ditto, no one in the Condega hospital.

    So,, They asked me to take a look at it (Which reminds me, I have to pull the stitches out of the cat that got fixed while I was away). So, I did, and it was clear that there was nothing wrong with his heart. I suggested gall bladder inflamation, not enough pain for pancreas, but there is no imaging capability of ANY kind in Condega.

    I say, is there a private doctor in Condega?? They don't know, but Nuria does know of one, so we all load up and drive the 8 blocks to his clinic. Clean and nice,, doctor concurs with my opinion (Whew!! I have a reputation to protect here). Doesn't think gallbladder, sure it's not pancreas, just alcohol withdrawal and the depletion of resources from alcohol abuse.

    He writes us a prescription for some IM vitamin injections, a liter of D5W laced with vitamins and some electrolytes. We get the stuff, a total of C$ 800 for everything, but Marvin doesn't want to go back to the Condega hospital. Ariana gives him the injection, but we both balk at doing the infusion. Marvin is already doing better, away from the booze, eating well (I'm doing most of the cooking). I load him up with some hydrocodone and lorazapam, and he has a peaceful night. Just the realization that his heart wasn't failing was probably a huge factor, and the lorazapam added the: What, Me Worry?? factor.

    The next morning we convince him to go to the hospital for the IV. The doctor specified so many drops per minute for a total of three hours; they were back from the hospital in an hour. For those who tout the wonders of socialized medicine in Nicaragua (and elsewhere): You buy your own medicine. The hospital might have some basic antibiotics for children, but not much else.

    Sleep, food, some movies finish out his week, and I woke to "Ariana, Ariana, " at 5 AM this morning -- Francisco wanting some breakfast before he and Marvin caught the first bus back to RobleDalito (and a 45 minute hike up the hill through the mud after that).

    But, family is family in Nicaragua. I know that they are grateful for my help, but gratitude is not expressed. It's simply expected of the family.

    There's an AA in San Jeronimo (closest community to RobleDalito) and Ariana and I are going to try and get Marvin to go to meetings. There IS that 45 minute walk through the mud each way. ..

    Pics: Nuria and Ariana at the hipico in Palacauina; the other two have nothing to do with anything relevant to this post or even the thread.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  21. #21

    Default Re: Poll: Why are you in Nicaragua?

    yeah, families can give you good insights. Mine came to me one day a couple months ago, out of the blue, and told me ``we`` made a big mistake years ago when she declined my offer to move her and her 2 youngest kids to Panama.

  22. #22
    Viejo del Foro Daddy-YO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Philly - León
    Posts
    1,362
    Blog Entries
    6

    Default Re: Poll: Why are you in Nicaragua?

    Quote Originally Posted by KeyWestPirate View Post
    . . . I know that they are grateful for my help, but gratitude is not expressed. It's simply expected of the family.
    You're right. That was the most difficult thing for me to become accustomed to. Not even a tiny 'gracias'. As I now see it, being one of the 'fam', it'd be as pointless as thanking myself. But it took a few years for my competitive gringo ego to submerge. (Either that or to become fully brainwashed?) In the States, I now find the excess of 'thanks' giving somewhat strange.


    Quote Originally Posted by KeyWestPirate View Post
    Pics: ... the other two have nothing to do with anything relevant to this post or even the thread.
    The Tona and FdC ads (& scenery) add distinct local flavor. Real (& good & cheap) enough to be two of the reasons many come here.
    "Lord, let me live until I die." - Will Rogers

  23. #23
    Para aquí para acá Jonh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    La Florida
    Posts
    15,101
    Blog Entries
    15

    Default Re: Poll: Why are you in Nicaragua?

    Help me decide, TRNers. I have a dilemma that needs to be resolved at some point. I don't know whether to move to the mountains near Miraflor and teach myself to play Spanish style guitar, or play Irish fiddle.

    The fiddle is easier to carry around, much smaller. I can put it in a checked suitcase for travel to and from. I first learned violin in 4th grade, then in high school I took lessons in bluegrass fiddle but never was much good at it. I played various kinds of guitar for about a decade but I've lost a lot of that skill too.

    There's not much else to do up on a mountain top with barely anyone else in sight, so this is an important decision!!!

  24. #24

    Default Re: Poll: Why are you in Nicaragua?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jonh View Post
    Help me decide, TRNers. I have a dilemma that needs to be resolved at some point. I don't know whether to move to the mountains near Miraflor and teach myself to play Spanish style guitar, or play Irish fiddle.

    The fiddle is easier to carry around, much smaller. I can put it in a checked suitcase for travel to and from. I first learned violin in 4th grade, then in high school I took lessons in bluegrass fiddle but never was much good at it. I played various kinds of guitar for about a decade but I've lost a lot of that skill too.

    There's not much else to do up on a mountain top with barely anyone else in sight, so this is an important decision!!!


    I can't tell you where to live,, but I can tell you: Avoid pigs with a passion.
    Except eating the pork of course, I had some baby backs yesterday,, delicious!

    The rest of the pig business sucks.
    I'm actively trying to extricate myself. A pig or two to eat,, great idea!!
    More than that,, you gotta be nuts!

    You heard it first here on TRN!!

  25. #25
    Para aquí para acá Jonh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    La Florida
    Posts
    15,101
    Blog Entries
    15

    Default Re: Poll: Why are you in Nicaragua?

    Wow, and you were such a porcophile for a while, there! What happened?

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Nicaragua poll results disputed (BBC)
    By dixietraveller in forum Today, in Nicaragua...
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-12-2008, 01:35 PM
  2. Cost of living Poll, Nicaragua
    By tresfrijoles in forum Today, in Nicaragua...
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 10-18-2008, 09:19 PM
  3. Poll on Socialism in Nicaragua
    By tresfrijoles in forum Nicaraguan Culture, Politics and History
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 05-19-2008, 10:18 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •