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Thread: On The Road ---Again!

  1. #1

    Default On The Road ---Again!

    But I'm doing it differently this time. Instead of the frenzied marathon I usually run (or drive), I'm taking my sweet time. Rather than do a night time crossing at Amotillo (Honduras into El Salvador) I spent the night in a little town (might be called Morazon, but not sure). Unstressed, refreshed, nourished with the included breakfast, I feel ready to take on the world, or at least the local aduana. Time for a sit down breakfast. Time to blog after breakfast. I have until the 12th to pick Shelley up at the airport in Tucson,, so arriving on the 10th gives me a couple days grace. Today is the second of June.

    The problem with the borders at night is,, and I've been through everyone of them at night,, they are infested with cockroaches of every stripe. By day, you can generally keep an eye on things (and your goods). By night, it gets more difficult. With two people, it becomes much easier. #1 gets his or her passport stamped, and then returns to the vehicle. #2 then goes for his passport stamp and then deals with the car permit and customs.

    By yourself, you are swarmed by the cockroaches who want to "help" you with simple paperwork that any idiot can do. Another swarm clusters around the vehicle looking for anything they can steal. Of all the borders, Amotillo seems to be the worst. The Honduran customs and migration people are helpful, efficient and friendly.

    Relax, keep your stress level low, the cockroaches will try to rattle you. Think of cockroaches desperate for a drug fix and you get an idea of the frenzy.

    ALL the borders have this low life crowd to some extent. Avoid them, keep your paperwork secure and organized, and in your hands, keep your vehicle locked. Take your time,, stop and buy a coffee.

    Arrive with sufficient copies of your documents for the trip. I put my passport, license and registration on one 8 x 11 sheet. You will need copies of your title as well. I use a Fed Ex envelope with colored manila folders to organize things. The red folder holds my originals, which are in plastic page protectors. Lose your originals and you are screwed. The cockroaches know this. With my system I have one sturdy envelope to deal with, and a place to stuff the myriad scraps of paper you will accumulate. Most if not all of the scraps you will throw out at the end of the trip.

    The car permit office will often want a copy of your passport page with the immigration stamp to complete the permit. So Migracion is always first. Anticipate the request and get a copy. The exit guard will often want a copy of the vehicle permit as you leave. Take a moment and get a copy. You may not need it,, but if you do .. .. . . So two trips to the copy shop, which will charge you a dime per copy.

    Any cargo in the bed of a pickup should be strapped down tightly. Park as closely as you can.

    It's not a bad drive from Nicaragua to the US ,, just long. The borders are really not difficult if you take your time and stay alert. I've found the officials to be increasingly friendly and helpful over the years.

    The worst part is the cockroaches, who can be impossibly persistent. Many are clearly drug users, or drunks, you can see it in their eyes.

    One thing that surprised me this time is, the interest in my coffee I'm bringing back. I have a about a quintal of various coffees, almost all oro except for a bag roasted at El Gato Negro. I had a quick inspection from the Agropecuario guy at Espino (who I had never met before). He liked the coffee.

    The Honduran aduana was,, "as much in small bags as you want, roasted,, ,, but you can't bring it in loose (suelo) like that. We chatted a bit,, he was very nice, knew me from previous trips,, mentioned he was thirsty, so I gave him $5 to buy a coke. Problem solved for both of us
    .

    I'm bringing back quite a bit of stuff for a couple who came to Nicaragua,, got their residencies, and quickly, probably used Tiffer, , bought a car, mess of appliances and furniture,, and then decided that Nicaragua was NOT for them. Guy liked the country,, wife did not. They took a bit of a bath unloading everything. I've been sitting on their smaller stuff, in eight rubbermaid tubs under my house, for over a year. I usually go back and forth more frequently.

    I've brought a lot of stuff down,, but never any quantity of something back to the US.

    It's the same drill going either way,, much like Peñas Blancas, you pass one side of a large building,, which side depends on your direction of travel. Unless you have a C4 plated car you will have to get a tourist permit from each country. This, and the aduana inspection, especially if you are heavily loaded,, takes the time. It's an interesting thing: You arrive with all this stuff, traveling as a tourist,, clearly a tourist doesn't need a table saw or a spare engine for his cement mixer.

    It's the aduana guy's call,, a good list of what you have, and an explanation of what you are up to: "Bought a farm in Nicaragua" goes a long way towards getting you through without problem.

    If it's too much stuff, and it has been a few times for me,, the aduana official will refer you to a customs agent who will prepare the paperwork for a 24 hour transit permit. At this point, although you have stamps in your passport that indicate you could stay in the country for, say, 90 days, you only have 24 hours to transit the country with your goods. This 24 hours is strictly enforced, and a breakdown requires you to find a police station and report your difficulty and get a denuncia to present at your exit border.

    I lost a belt for my vacuum pump on a Ford diesel I brought down one night in Guatemala. No brakes. I was towing a 24 foot fifth wheel what was overloaded with ,, well,, everything I'd filled the walls with all kinds of stuff, the sub floor where the tankage is was full of everything including 16 golf cart batteries.

    This was the trip where I stopped twice in Mexico to re-work axles and springs on the trailer.

    I found a mechanic the next morning, and a belt, but missed the 24 hour deadline. I had to get a lawyer to draw up a document for Aduana's approval that explained my difficulty. Lost another day there.



    The customs agent will charge you about $100 to do the documentation of your load. It's strange,, one country will insist, another will let you slide. Part of the adventure.

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    House SOB Little Corn Tom's Avatar
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    Default Re: On The Road ---Again!

    Nice post and nice to hear about your new trip attitude.

    Hope things work out with the Ex.
    Life's different here ... It's a whole 'nother pace.

  3. #3

    Default Re: On The Road ---Again!

    Quote Originally Posted by Little Corn Tom View Post
    Nice post and nice to hear about your new trip attitude.

    Hope things work out with the Ex.
    They seem to be,, I'm pleading I had dementia caused by the lack of oxygen to my brain caused by the long term pneumonia

    But,,, I've learned my lesson,, and in retrospect don't understand what was going through my skull.
    Could have been . . . .. ..dementia caused by the lack of oxygen to my brain caused by the long term pneumonia

    Or, it could have been simple stupidity. . . . coupled with an old man's desire to relive his youth, fueled by a tight butt and perky tits. I doubt that I am the first -or the last-- to go down that road to perdition.

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    Para aquí para acá Jonh's Avatar
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    Default Re: On The Road ---Again!

    Corrupt bureaucrats and petty thieves; why would I want to deal with that crap at all?

  5. #5

    Default Re: On The Road ---Again!

    "Sweet Time" took a turn for the worse when the migration guy coming into El Salvador says: "You have three days left".
    It's that C4 thing that often bites people who drive. You're clocked from the time you enter Guatemala until you leave Guatemala.

    The Honduran side of Amotillo had cleaned out all the cockroaches,, not a one,, no one even wanted to look at my stuff.
    Both the migracion and the aduana people were very nice. I was done in a half hour.

    Plenty of time,, but not the leisure I was looking forward to. El Salvador (at Amotillo at least) now processes the "livianos" with the commercial trucks, and they were badly backed up. Tourist vehicles usually enjoy a level of "go to head of the line" at the borders,, for example, going to the head of the line of trucks. It took me three hours to get my permiso,, where it's usually ready in an hour or less. After dawdling earlier, this put me back on the road late,, about 3PM. The permiso is free in El Salvador

    I watched the entrance guard look at my plate and and compare it to the permiso sheet. I opened the left door and read off the VIN to him. At least one was correct
    Again,, no interest in my stuff,, or my coffee.

    I drove into El Salvador until I was tired and found a gas station that offered parking to big rigs, and paid $2 to park for the night,, access to the bathrooms included. With the pillow I always bring I slept well until dawn, and continued on to Hachadura, the border between El Salvador and Guatemala. Here the El Salvador exit guard discovers a discrepancy between my plate number and what is on the permiso. A 7 instead of a 4.

    So, the jefe comes out, takes pictures,, examines a permiso I fortuitously had from a year earlier to satisfy himself that I didn't change the plate overnight. He explains that it all has to go back to Amotillo where they will generate a corrected permiso and send it on to Hachadura. I ask,, 'how long?" and he says just a few minutes, >>>>> but will depend on when the Amotillo jefe gets into the office. It's 7AM.

    This is important,, and can't be simply overlooked,, as Guatemala uses the El Salvador permiso to generate their permiso. So, the permiso I take to the Guatemala aduana has to be accurate. I pass the time with a friend,, George, a deportee from the US who recently married a 19 YO cutie and had a 4 mo daughter since I saw him last. George speaks flawless English, left a wife in the US, and after many years decided to move on.

    He has a herd of 30 goats he milks, and we talked chickens,, etc. The time passed pleasantly with pupusas and fresh squeezed OJ, and the corrected permiso appears. I left at 11AM, with my Guatemalan permiso in hand. Guatemalan permiso costs $23 and has to be paid in Quetzales. A sprint across Guatemala, and I arrive at El Carmen (Talisman), my new crossing point,, at 6PM I used Tecun Uman for years, but find El Carmen easier and faster.

    "You can't take the coffee into Mexico" says the Mexican aduana guy, "and the honey doesn't have a label, so it can't go in either". The coffee is green,, oro. This is a one lane access to Mexico, and the line is getting longer. I politely explain that many friends are waiting for the coffee,, probe a bit here and there, looking for an opening. The key is staying reasonable, looking for a solution: maybe he's thirsty. Maybe I can wear him down.

    Finally, I get him to agree that the coffee can come in if it's toasted. A couple of people are starting to honk their horns.
    Where to get it toasted? I'd have to go back to Guatemala and I closed out my car permit. That means hauling the coffee back into Guatemala on the bus. This crossing has a large hotel with a large parking lot BETWEEN the borders,, in no man's land so to speak. Most of the borders have something like this,, large commercial strips that are between the borders. The borders are basically open, and you can wander back and forth on foot.

    So,, I say,, look,, " I'll drive back to the hotel and drop off the coffee there. I'll come back and go into Tapachula (no car permit required 70 miles into Mexico),,, and make some calls and see if I can find a roaster." He agrees to that plan and I turn the truck around and head back towards Guatemala and drive into the hotel parking lot. The hotel has the only serious and secure parking between the two borders, and charges accordingly: $4

    As I enter the lot,, I'm immediately approached by "Carlos" and his crew who already know what my problem is. They don't know it's coffee, just know it's something that won't pass into Mexico. Mexico and Guatemala are separated by a river here as in Tecun Uman,, and I had seen Haitians wading the river from Guatemala into Mexico on my last trip. Now, with the rains, the river is a raging torrent.

    After some negotiation Carlos agrees to take the coffee across for $60 (we started at $100). It's a lot of coffee, and it's really good stuff. They have a little innertube boat that they use to swim the goods across.

    I turn back into Mexico,, get my passport stamped and my Mexico trip permit, endure another customs inspection since I had to get back into line,, and head towards Tapachula. Two hundred yards down the road, Carlos waves me over, loads my coffee, and collects his $60. He beat me across the river. So now I just claim that I bought the coffee in Mexico, if anyone should ask,, and that's unlikely.

    The drive into Tapachula from the border is 6KM, and I've never seen any migration revision between the border and Tapachula.. Tapachula is an interesting city,, large, prosperous, full of immigrants waiting to continue the trip north. They don't seem to be bothered by anyone. Many find work here and never continue the trip north.

    I always stay at the Fenix in Tapachula,
    http://www.fenix.com.mx/
    it's well kept,, has an old fashioned feel,, large,, AC, hot water, secure parking,, $43

    The rest of the trip should be uneventful. Mexico usually is. I went to the big Galeria Walmart, found some beautiful apricots reasonably priced,, got my phone re-chipped so I can call ---just about anywhere. TelCel in Mexico is amazing,, service is outstanding,, and the prices are reasonable.

  6. #6
    House SOB Little Corn Tom's Avatar
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    Default Re: On The Road ---Again!

    Nice post....obviously you are a well seasoned traveler on this route.
    Life's different here ... It's a whole 'nother pace.

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    Para aquí para acá Jonh's Avatar
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    Default Re: On The Road ---Again!

    Key West Pirate and his Wetback Coffee.

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    Default Re: On The Road ---Again!

    The level of patience you have for all the bureaucracy is impressive. You could probably make a good living in the ex-pat shipping industry.

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    Viejo del Foro Daddy-YO's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kwah2249 View Post
    The level of patience you have for all the bureaucracy is impressive. You could probably make a good living in the ex-pat shipping industry.
    Patience is a prerequisite for living in the mañana-culture of Latin America. It's true that a whole 'nuther level is needed to tunnel thru the bureaucratic fiefdoms at border crossings. The know-how (& healed scars) that comes with having done it several times before helps, although it's evident that every time is a 'new' adventure.

    Our pirate-farmer has such deep pockets, it's not clear that many expats - who tend to be poor - could afford what he'd need to charge to make a profit. Nor does it seem to me he'd be interested. He's more just a good friend to expats in need.

    Mr. Pirate, I'm enjoying reading your as-you-go trip report very much. Thanks for taking the time to share. I too stayed in Hotel Fenix in Tapachula many a time, tho I always bunked in a cheap room - no A/C - but plenty comfy. Loved hanging out in the nearby zocolo. My last round trip Philly-Leon was 2011. Of my 8 one-way (3800 mi) trips most were solo. I only drove in daylight, cause my night vision is poor and few roads had good lines. I toured about a bit, tho not far from my chosen route. Never got robbed - if you don't count paying off a few cops. Now that AA is charging 3/4 fare for our 2-going-on-3 yr old I'll need to revisit the economics of driving vs flying. The border crossings are a hassle, but if you're well prepared - n fotocopies of all documents, as the pirate man outlines - and you know which of the poorly marked buildings to go to, it ain't so bad. Hell, it's an adventure, something to write home about.

    Godspeed Mr. Pirate!
    I never met a Semite I didn't like.

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    Para aquí para acá Jonh's Avatar
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    Default Re: On The Road ---Again!

    But, but, you can live high class for $1500 a month! I just read it in the news the other day!

  11. #11

    Default Re: On The Road ---Again!

    Quote Originally Posted by Daddy-YO View Post
    Patience is a prerequisite for living in the mañana-culture of Latin America. It's true that a whole 'nuther level is needed to tunnel thru the bureaucratic fiefdoms at border crossings. The know-how (& healed scars) that comes with having done it several times before helps, although it's evident that every time is a 'new' adventure.

    Our pirate-farmer has such deep pockets, it's not clear that many expats - who tend to be poor - could afford what he'd need to charge to make a profit. Nor does it seem to me he'd be interested. He's more just a good friend to expats in need.

    Mr. Pirate, I'm enjoying reading your as-you-go trip report very much. Thanks for taking the time to share. I too stayed in Hotel Fenix in Tapachula many a time, tho I always bunked in a cheap room - no A/C - but plenty comfy. Loved hanging out in the nearby zocolo. My last round trip Philly-Leon was 2011. Of my 8 one-way (3800 mi) trips most were solo. I only drove in daylight, cause my night vision is poor and few roads had good lines. I toured about a bit, tho not far from my chosen route. Never got robbed - if you don't count paying off a few cops. Now that AA is charging 3/4 fare for our 2-going-on-3 yr old I'll need to revisit the economics of driving vs flying. The border crossings are a hassle, but if you're well prepared - n fotocopies of all documents, as the pirate man outlines - and you know which of the poorly marked buildings to go to, it ain't so bad. Hell, it's an adventure, something to write home about.

    Godspeed Mr. Pirate!



    The borders are getting a lot better ---and easier There are actually instructions in English in some locations, and the customs and migration offices are better marked with big exterior signs. People are friendlier and more helpful.

    The copy thing is mostly solved by arriving with a lot of your own copies. I make up one that has passport page, driver's license and registration on the same sheet. They are in color. The only other copy you need a lot of is your title.
    You will still need the odd copy of the stamp just put into your passport. If you have a Nica plated car you avoid most of this, and save a lot of money. I drove my CR plated car into the US without issue.

    Keep the originals separate with some system,, such as plastic page protectors. You don't want to give up an original accidentally.
    ALWAYS double check that you get all originals back..
    The driver's license left on the copy machine glass is a killer.

    That said, and while it IS getting much easier than when I started five or six years ago,, expect changes.
    You can push, but you also have to allow time for . . .. whatever..

    When I left Tapachula pointed north, I expected nothing more than a long and monotonous drive. NOT!! I immediately ran into a road blockage, these were teachers. They planned to block the highway until 8PM that evening. Luckily, someone offered to show me a way around. An hour later,, and $12 poorer,, and many really bad roads, I was back on track. This has never happened before.

    On track lasted just a couple of hours,, and I hit another road block south of Salina Cruz. Here,, there was no getting around it and I sat there until 10PM. This one backed up the Oxaca traffic for miles. It was some officials from some piss-assed litttle village who hadn't been paid for a month. A small hand full, drunker and drunker as the evening progressed. Puros Vagos.

    There were little kids,, babies and old people in the line and it was HOT.

    Then,, they had a mini- hurricane a week or so ago that collapsed the bridge on THE highway to Oaxaca. I'm now sitting on the west coast in Pojutla. You either detour via the coast towards Acapulco, or go through the mountains towards Veracruz.

    My bank suddenly and without notice decided that some of my charges were suspicious, and shut down the major debit card I use.

    They are very responsive,, a minor problem quickly resolved in the US,, but they only post an 888 number for customer service, and I cannot call it from my TelCel phone. I can call anyone else in the US,, unlimited. But,, not 800 numbers!

    But, fortunately, I allowed myself plenty of time. I meet Shelley in Tucson on the 12th,, and we drive to my daughter's wedding which happens on the 17th. Today is the 6th. After Oaxaca I should have just three days,, less even.

    So, the adventure never ends!

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    Default Re: On The Road ---Again!

    Reminds me of my bottle of rum with the slightly dirty label. We I was a wee munchkin I visited my wayward older uncle in El Paso. One day I walked across to Juarez and bought a bottle of booze, which they didn't allow to pass customs. Not to be robbed my the Govmint, I returned to Mexico, walked along the bank of the ole rio grand to a spot where I buried my hooch like the treasure it was and then returned to customs. Later in the week when he went on a groceries and gas run we went to my spot and retrieved my bottle, intact, and drove it to Texas. He was doubly impressed, first that it was still there and second that I pulled it off. Pretty good for a boy raised by women in the ghetto!

    I didn't even like rum, so I had that bottle of rum around for years, like a prized trophy or something.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jonh View Post
    Key West Pirate and his Wetback Coffee.

    "Support mental health or I'll break your head"

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    Dog Whisperer cookshow's Avatar
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    Default Re: On The Road ---Again!

    Oaxaca is famous for protests. First time I went in 91 there were 1000's of teachers camped in the Zocalo
    ‎"You know what you say when people tell you you can't do something? Fool, shut your mouth up!"
    Ernie K Doe

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    Para aquí para acá Jonh's Avatar
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    Default Re: On The Road ---Again!

    Oaxaca is also the most fun city name to say out loud.

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    Active TRN Member RGV AG's Avatar
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    Default Re: On The Road ---Again!

    Quote Originally Posted by cookshow View Post
    Oaxaca is famous for protests. First time I went in 91 there were 1000's of teachers camped in the Zocalo
    And those sumbitches are probably still there.....I remember visiting Oaxaca, Oaxaca probably circa 1975 with my parents and there was some kind of major upheaval with the CFE, Mexico's national power company, and the lights in about the whole city started going out. My parents, and most other adults, were pissed off. I thought it was hilarious. I guess this was a Mexican Lights Off instead of Stand off.

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    Viejo del Foro Daddy-YO's Avatar
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    Returning to Philly I never drove far on the left coast of Mexico, but usually crossed the isthmus at Juchitan and continue northward thru Veracruz. I remember encountering teacher strikes in Chiapas.

    Those green mountains of southern Mexico and Guatemala have a high proportion of indigenous folk, many Mayan, that stick strongly to their cultural traditions, even after hundreds of years of having been 'conquered'. Many don't even speak much Spanish - just enough to sell colorful wares to gringos. Their mental separation from the ruling Spanish culture is often a point of irritation to the authorities, leading to over-reaction and mistreatment. Usually several teachers in strikes there get killed - something that's unheard of here in the States.

    The native cultures in the USA were all but wiped out, in contrast to Latin America. The key historic difference was that the pilgrims and like European settlers came here with their wives. The conquistadors were all men who'd left their families in Spain. They enslaved the native men to dig for gold & silver, but native women were, after all, women.

    Hey Mr. Pirate, attending your daughter's wedding with your ex sounds like a surefire way to rekindle that ol' flame. (That plus the presumed period of abstinence since losing daily access to that "tight butt and perky tits".)
    I never met a Semite I didn't like.

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    Default Re: On The Road ---Again!

    Quote Originally Posted by Jonh View Post
    Oaxaca is also the most fun city name to say out loud.

    There was a huelga in Oaxaca this morning too.

    I tried really hard last night to get to my favorite hotel in Oaxaca, where the toll road from the north dumps you into Oaxaca. I need a shower, shave and flatter surface to sleep on. Endless topes that I simply couldn't see in the dark, a light drizzle, defeated me. The drive over the "sierra" from the coast exhausted me. The curves are so tight that I doubt that a semi could negotiate them. The road is narrow with abrupt drop offs. It requires constant attention.

    The recent "hurricane" had damaged it badly,, causing landslides and washing out the downslope sides of the pavement. There were a lot of crews with heavy equipment working on it. And it's long,, six hours or more. That road must have been an engineering marvel when it was constructed. It's 262 Km from the coast to Oaxaca, every inch of it tightly curved.

    NO gasoline beyond what is sold in jugs along the way.

    Still, at the top, beautiful, tasty apples,, incredible views.
    Cold,, all the Mexicans in parkas.
    I'm glad I did it but doubt that I would do it again.

    So, I wound up at another Pemex for the night.
    Thank God for baby wipes, you can bathe completely with four or five of them.
    I shaved at one of the toll road bathrooms.

    Finally getting to Oaxaca, the police (Policia Vial) were diverting everyone from the main drag through the city to parallel side streets. Desperate Oaxacans trying to get to work were turning three lanes into five,, it was madness. Locuria. They all have tiny cars, hard to compete for space with my Ford F150.

    I finally managed to get out of it into a Pemex where Margarita filled my tank,, cleaned ALL my windows, checked the air in all the tires, and even danced a bit,, all the while maintaining a conversation,, "You live in Nicaragua ??,, you should move to Oaxaca" while the tank filled. Performance art that undoubtedly gets her 50 peso tips like the one I gave her. I killed an hour there and resumed as the traffic died down.

    Anyone who's been to Oaxaca knows that the traffic is difficult all the time,, really snotty during rush hour. Margarita didn't know who was responsible for this road blockage. It's spreading like a virus.

    I've been watching them construct this overhead bypass through Puebla for two years, another nasty place to be stuck during rush hour. It's done and it's sweet. It runs the whole length of Puebla, and you just fly over the city. It drops you ten Klicks south of the Arco Norte access. Then,, the Arco Norte bypasses all of Mexico City,, dropping you east of Morelia and back on the 15.
    So, now it's Oaxaca, fast toll road to just south of Puebla,, over the bypass, ten klicks to the Arco Norte, and the 15 all the way to Arizona.

    I'm at a Starbucks just before the Arco Norte, listening to jazz, drinking a decent cup of coffee,, about the same price as in the US,,
    >>>and - - - missing Nicaragua. The dementia may be more profound that I realize, or maybe it's a brain tumor.

    Gas was about 2.70 at Tapachula, but has risen to about $3 in the interior. Mexico has had this policy for years of selling gas less expensively at the borders.

    So,, the rest of it should just be a long and tedious drive

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    Para aquí para acá Jonh's Avatar
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    Default Re: On The Road ---Again!

    Down in the Mexican town of Oaxaca, I fell in love with a Mexican girl
    Night time would find me at Pemex gas station, windows got washed, Margarita would whirl.
    One night a wild old gringo came in, wild as the Esteli wind
    Dashing and daring, a drink he was sharing with wicked Marg'rita, the girl that I loved...

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    House SOB Little Corn Tom's Avatar
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    Default Re: On The Road ---Again!

    Excellent.......perhaps you could post video? MTV style? Sombrero?
    Life's different here ... It's a whole 'nother pace.

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    Para aquí para acá Jonh's Avatar
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    Default Re: On The Road ---Again!

    Rough draft...


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    Default Re: On The Road ---Again!

    Thanks. Beats watching the Comey testimony.
    I never met a Semite I didn't like.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Daddy-YO View Post
    Thanks. Beats watching the Comey testimony.
    Here ya go!


  23. #23

    Default Re: On The Road ---Again!

    ahh, culture as I know it. You remind my of my wayward Uncle Jimmy who would tell stories of the old days when you could ride to Juarez, get drunk, and the horse would take you home to El Paso.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jonh View Post
    Rough draft...


    "Support mental health or I'll break your head"

    ​Poster/bumper sticker from the 1970s

  24. #24
    TRN Science officer bill_bly_ca's Avatar
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    Default Re: On The Road ---Again!

    Yelling "Oaxaca" then saying Ei ei ei, while thrusting your sombrero in the air sounds, almost second nature
    ==================================================
    Dude !!!.... Its a Canal !!! Can you Dig it ??

  25. #25

    Default Re: On The Road ---Again!

    Quote Originally Posted by Jonh View Post
    Down in the Mexican town of Oaxaca, I fell in love with a Mexican girl
    Night time would find me at Pemex gas station, windows got washed, Margarita would whirl.
    One night a wild old gringo came in, wild as the Esteli wind
    Dashing and daring, a drink he was sharing with wicked Marg'rita, the girl that I loved...


    Love it.

    A younger man could just put up in Oaxaca for un ratito, court Margarita,, and see where it leads.

    A cousin of Graham Greene (Felix) sublet his apartment in San Francisco to me for a year or so.
    He found his wife in a Mexican hovel, a young girl of fifteen,, or so he told the story.
    Love at first sight. He wrapped a blanket around her and they left together.
    There MAY have been more detail,, but this was mid 60's and my memory is not what it used to be.

    He had written a picture book that chronicled some of the abuses perpetrated by the US in Vietnam.
    One of my personal favorites was a pic of an APC with a string of VietCong ears hanging from its radio antenna.
    Those were different times. A great time to be in San Francisco.

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