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Thread: AHH,,, TRN

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    Dog Whisperer cookshow's Avatar
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    Default AHH,,, TRN

    Who would have thought we would contaminate the internet.

    Googled best tacos in Esteli, yep TRN.... .
    ‎"You know what you say when people tell you you can't do something? Fool, shut your mouth up!"
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    Dog Whisperer cookshow's Avatar
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    Default Re: AHH,,, TRN

    The new food craze is Mexican Tacos, they are everywhere, even in small towns.
    ‎"You know what you say when people tell you you can't do something? Fool, shut your mouth up!"
    Ernie K Doe

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    Para aquí para acá Jonh's Avatar
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    Default Re: AHH,,, TRN

    So where’s the place in Estelí?

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    Viejo del Foro el duende grande's Avatar
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    Default Re: AHH,,, TRN

    I'll have to ask my wife but they are here. Nica tacos, as you probably know, look like enchiladas or taquitos with cabbage and white stuff on top.

    When we vacationed in CDMX a main priority was to find street tacos on orders from our Mexican SIL in L.A. Wasn't hard to do!

    "Support mental health or I'll break your head"


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    Dog Whisperer cookshow's Avatar
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    Default Re: AHH,,, TRN

    Saw few places that looked promising, but no customers, that is a deal breaker for me. Low turnover of food, let someone else suffer the consequences.
    ‎"You know what you say when people tell you you can't do something? Fool, shut your mouth up!"
    Ernie K Doe

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    Para aquí para acá Jonh's Avatar
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    Default Re: AHH,,, TRN

    Go to Koma Rico, a block east from the south side of the Cathedral. Not necessarily Mexican, but good street food.

  7. #7
    Viejo del Foro el duende grande's Avatar
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    Default Re: AHH,,, TRN

    Ditto that. I have had enough parasites and the medicines that go with them to last a lifetime. I have a short list of restaurants I will go to here in town, and don't particularly trust them! Sanitation is not in the culture and is not economic. Just yesterday I happened to pass by one of my favorites while they were receiving a milk delivery. Muchacho ladling milk from an open 55 gallon drum into a 5 gallon bucket in the back of a pickup on a busy street. No wonder when one grandkid was in the hospital the doctor called all the mothers together and told them to never let their kids drink frescos or leche in any form in restaurants. Do it at home or don't do it.

    Oh, yeah, bought a portable water filter while I was up in the states. Grayl 24 oz, does viruses and some chems. Mostly I bought it for travel and for airports to avoid buying $3 bottles of water. Works good so I am testing it out for daily use on Esteli tapwater that is so-so depending on the well and the plumbing. It's 90 bucks, but the replacement filters are 25ish so it will pencil out in the long run, especially on airport and bottled water in Costa Rica which can be pricey..

    Quote Originally Posted by cookshow View Post
    Saw few places that looked promising, but no customers, that is a deal breaker for me. Low turnover of food, let someone else suffer the consequences.

    "Support mental health or I'll break your head"


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    Viejo del Foro Daddy-YO's Avatar
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    Default Re: AHH,,, TRN

    Leon has a 5-block strip where Nica tacos are immensely popular. It's the main drag leading to shore points. Evenings it's like a scene from American Graffiti with the continuous traffic and long lines of people waiting to buy tacos and the flickering cooking fires. Chicken or pork wrap-sealed like an egg roll and deep fried, then topped with shredded cabbage and 'crema dulce' (sour cream) (& salsa picante). It began here in 2011 and grew, exponentially in the last few years. Maybe half (the originals) are sidewalk vendors, women also offering sodas from coolers and lawn chairs (many carry several home), and single-room sit-down restaurants that offer beer. The turnover is phenomenal.

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    Viejo del Foro el duende grande's Avatar
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    Default Re: AHH,,, TRN

    My wife said there are 2 places in Esteli, both too greasy so she doesn't go to them. Sorry, your mileage may vary.

    "Support mental health or I'll break your head"


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    Para aquí para acá Jonh's Avatar
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    Default Re: AHH,,, TRN

    There was Taqueria Beverly, at the southeast corner of the cathedral, but I think she closed; not positive.

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    Active TRN Member RGV AG's Avatar
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    Default Re: AHH,,, TRN

    Really good tacos are actually pretty hard to find in Nicaragua due to the tortilla situation. The Nica's don't, save in rare occurrences and by special design, use lime (the powdered stuff) in their tortilla mix, thus the tortillas have to be thicker and clumpier to stay together. True Mexican style tortillas are very rare, and that is the key to any good taco. There was a taqueria in Managua, can't remember their name, that had very good tacos and made their own tortillas. Tacoriendo in Gallerias, don't know if it is still there had decent tacos as long as they were minutes removed from their tortilla machine, otherwise they got stiff and fell apart. Pricey for tacos though.

    There is a "Mexican" restaurant in Tipitapa, down near the market, run by a guy who spent close to 20 years in Mexico. Overall his place was the best Mexican food, including tacos, that I found in Nicaragua. I think the name of the place is Taqueria Jireh or something, big Christian guy. They make mole and some other things as well. He even had Epazote growing in his little garden. His tortillas were hit and miss, I guess due to labor turnover, but when they were hit they were very good.

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    Viejo del Foro Daddy-YO's Avatar
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    Default Re: AHH,,, TRN

    More than a year ago a fancy Mexican restaurant opened in Leon, named Jalisco. I ate tacos al pastor there the other nite. Stuffed open-folded soft corn tortillas, 4 for 180 cords ($5.40). The stuffing could have had more meat to my taste and a little less pineapple, but was otherwise delicious & filling (con mas Victorias!). The kids loved their quesadillas and chalupas. I enjoyed chile relleno (stuffed sweet pepper) there before. Their best dish IMO was poached fish (curvina al ajillo o Veracruzano). There are a few more hole-in-the-wall Mexican restaurants here in Leon that we never tried out.

    I've been drinking tap-water in Leon for more than 10 years, never a problem. In a restaurant you have to ask for a 'glass of water', usually served with ice, always free. If you ask for a water they'll bring their bottled stuff. The best food that we buy from curbside cook-stands is chanchos con yuca, served wrapped in leaves, one portion (70 cords) is plenty for one. Good nacatamales are getting harder to find. Only once did I get sick from curbside food; it was the cabbage salad that came with a serving of carne asado (shish-kabobs).

    Once there were an abundance of very good restaurants in Leon. Several that were overpriced, too fancy appeared during the boom years when Leon was named the next bargain retirement location and you saw nearly as many pale-faces as morenos on the streets. Those spots faded away well before the crisis. The crisis closed down many that mostly catered to foreigners, usually owned by foreigners. A dozen, more or less, good restaurants remain and they're struggling. Menus have been tightened. It's more difficult to get a good steak, but there are a couple of places. Ditto on seafood, but with a quick trip to Poneloya-Las Penitas, one can score delicious fresh fish. Meanwhile the chancho-con-yuca stands on Leon's streets are doing a great business.

    Boom-bust cycles happen everywhere for various reasons. It's during a bust that the core values, the true identity of a place come to the surface. Nicaragua is a good place.

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    Viejo del Foro el duende grande's Avatar
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    Default Re: AHH,,, TRN

    "yellow tortillas" are occasionally available in Esteli. I don't know the process they use to make them but they are made locally. The normal tortillas, which I like to call "cardboard tortillas", are the norm. They can be good if warm and you are hungry, but it goes downhill from there.

    Fortunately, Mexican chili salsas can be had in cans and bottles here in the supers to add a little flavor to the food. Nic is not a big chili country and most people here who eat chilis eat them in chileros which is chilis and other things in vinegar.

    We kidnapped a chili indio plant from an empty lot and it grows well but is a little too hot for me. We put a few with diced onions in a vinegar/water mix chilero. Jalapenos are grown here as are the hotter congos. I grow some serrano which are milder and they seem well received.

    Many years ago there was a Mexican restaurant in Masaya that made a good mole poblano. I don't know if it is still there.

    "Support mental health or I'll break your head"


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    Default Re: AHH,,, TRN

    My wife still hand-pats tortillas made from MaSeca and water. The 1/4” thick kind.

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    Viejo del Foro Daddy-YO's Avatar
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    Default Re: AHH,,, TRN

    The best ‘tortilla’ I’ve ever eaten is a güirila from Matagalpa. I barely consider it a tortilla. Traditionally eaten with cuajada, a soft cheese, they’re unbelievably delicious. It's too stiff & easily broken to use to make tacos. My wife is from a small mountain town in that department and she/we regularly make a pilgrimage there to gorge on güirila, cuajada and fine Matagalpan coffee there in the mountain air.

    A güirila is a tortilla made from young white corn. They are thick, sweet, filling, and usually eaten with crumbled white cheese. Güirilas are cooked on a hot metal sheet in banana leaves to prevent them from sticking or burning. Güirilas originated in Palcila, a small town in Matagalpa, in the north of Nicaragua. - Wiki


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    Default Re: AHH,,, TRN

    Mmmm, guirilas! They make good ones in Sebaco, IIRC. With the cheese, they are a delight.

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    Viejo del Foro el duende grande's Avatar
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    Default Re: AHH,,, TRN

    Guirillas cause brake lining wear...

    We have to stop at every guirilla joint along the road!

    "Support mental health or I'll break your head"


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    Default Re: AHH,,, TRN

    Quote Originally Posted by el duende grande View Post
    Guirillas cause brake lining wear...

    We have to stop at every guirilla joint along the road!

  19. #19

    Default Re: AHH,,, TRN

    Quote Originally Posted by Jonh View Post
    There was Taqueria Beverly, at the southeast corner of the cathedral, but I think she closed; not positive.


    She closed for a while,, I saw some activity there before I left in September.

    I ate there one,, the service was terrible,, the two meseras spent the entire time talking and playing with their phones. Maybe they just didn't like Gringos, but I was there with Krisnia.

    That is an outstanding location,, I've always been fascinated by the penthouse apartment on top.

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    Para aquí para acá Jonh's Avatar
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    Default Re: AHH,,, TRN

    I’ve been up there, Beverly is a relative of my wife, but then, half of Estelí seems to be.

    You’re right about the service.

  21. #21
    Viejo del Foro Daddy-YO's Avatar
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    Default Re: AHH,,, TRN

    A philosophical detour:
    To many native Americans, corn was/is the sacred source of life from Pachamama. Most Latinos have indigenous blood, understandably since Spanish women didn’t come here until after a few hundred years of ‘civilizing’ the Americas by the conquistadors and Catholic priests. Many Latinos still consider corn tortillas to be a requisite part of every meal. Is it or could it be something partly spiritual, a part of their soul, or a Jung put it, their collective unconscious?

    Gringos, on the other hand, fled Europe with their wives who couldn’t tolerate the American savages, which led to a near genocidal extermination. Wheat bread - rolls, cakes, &c. - has been and remains an important part of most gringo meals. They say we are what we eat. But eating habits change, esp, as cultures mix. As much as I try to fit in, I still prefer buttered toast over regular hot corn tortillas with my beans and fried cheese. Sure bread is an imprinted taste, one I grew up with, but could it also be because of the subliminal effect on me of the Lord’s Prayer - “Gives us our daily bread” - that I recited much of my rote life?
    Last edited by Daddy-YO; 01-30-2020 at 09:37 PM. Reason: comma redacted on account of a misunderstanding by the distinguished Senator from the Ohio near Canada

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    House SOB Little Corn Tom's Avatar
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    Default Re: AHH,,, TRN

    You imply that buttered toast is not "regular".
    What then is "regular" toast?
    Sorry, but I am from Ohio.....it is up near Canada.
    Life's different here ... It's a whole 'nother pace.

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    Default Re: AHH,,, TRN

    Dry toast

    I think they call that “croutons.”

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    Active TRN Member RGV AG's Avatar
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    Default Re: AHH,,, TRN

    If a meal doesn't have rice, beans, and tortillas it should be considered an appetizer.

  25. #25
    Active TRN Member RGV AG's Avatar
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    Default Re: AHH,,, TRN

    I like güirila's, they are tasty. I also love cuajada. One thing I loved about Nicaragua is that you could get Rice and Beans first thing in the morning. Cuajada, Gallo Pinto and some bad ass hot sauce coupled with some fresh made thick ass tortillas and I was set.

    The jalapeno's I had in Nicaragua were some of the best, if not the best, that I had have had in a long time. An agronomist told me that most of the peppers there were "natural" in that they had not been bred down on the spiciness scale as is the case with now with Mexican jalapeno's and the ones in the US too. You sell a lot more of them if they don't pica too much.

    I never saw a poblano pepper in Nicaragua, and couldn't understand that. The congo's or habanero's there were excellent as well. I do love Nica "chilero's", but I ate the peppers too. Overall Nicaraguan food is pretty good, just a little boring and not too many varieties. I tell you something else, by far, the best spinach I have ever had was in Nicaragua, good Lord it tasted wonderful. I think it was the soil.

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