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Thread: Bread

  1. #1

    Default Bread

    So,, after getting the ice cream mostly figured out . . . .

    Tomorrow we're doing some chocolate,, but will try to "fluff" the mix in a blender to make it more like the commercial product. Try to entrain some air in the mix.

    When I was a boy living in Iowa,, we'd buy ice cream from the cooperative that my grandfather sold his milk to. Saturday was "town day" , and the ice cream was the last of the shopping.

    The ice cream was hard packed into a paper carton, probably a quart.
    I never got the "hard packed" thing, and I never asked.
    But it was very much like what we are getting now with our efforts.

    We're killing all our chickens next Tuesday, and starting over.
    And with just Gaylord, and Chuck and Nancy,, we have time to play around a bit.


    Anyway,, on to the bread. It's tough to get good bread here.
    Even when you find something that has a decent texture, it has no flavor.

    We bake almost every day, four days during the week, and Sunday.
    We've got it down, the loaf is always perfect, and it's easy.
    We use a bread machine,, but don't bake with it.
    We let the machine mix the ingredients, the serious work, and let it rise the first time in the machine.

    Then we pull the bread from the machine,, punch it down into a loaf pan, and let it rise again.
    We turn the oven on low to pre-heat it,, and the loaf rises nicely on top of the stove in 15-20 minutes.
    A teaspoon of honey makes the bread darker, and the crust chewier.
    Without the honey you get a thinner crust, and a lighter color.

    We found a flour that gives us excellent and consistent results.
    Made from a Canadian wheat, it's milled in Granada.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2

    Default Re: Bread

    So, the blender definitely worked its magic
    I ran it on high for 30 seconds to froth the mixture before putting it in the ice cream machine.

    The ice cream now has "texture".

    For those of you who live in civilization and can just go by La Colonia and get a quart of Los Pinos from CR,, this probably sounds like too much work.

    But like the bread,, really, once you have a process in place, it's not.

    We have one package of cream left.
    We'll keep it in the fridge and monitor it to see how long it keeps.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  3. #3
    Viejo del Foro Daddy-YO's Avatar
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    Default Re: Bread

    Back when my life’s path took a detour (a year-long solo loop of NAm, Canada, USA & Mexico in a Mustang-made-into-camper), upon returning to the true path, I learned to make bread. All types. Daily, or damn near. Always handmade; kneading is a zen exercise. Besides, I found it important to have a feel for the mass. Every morning I’d get up before my girls went to school to bake a fresh loaf so slices would melt butter and be ready for strawberry freezer jam. It was my way of giving a strawberry-fields-forever tilt to their upcoming another-brick-in-the-wall experience. I’d knead the dough the nite before, an excellent release after 8 hours of square-dancing to corporate music, and let it rise in a warm, moist box I made and still have.

    Not in Leon, jodido. We’re blessed with the restaurants Pan y Paz run by a French baker and managed by his Dutch wife. Their breads provoke uncontrolled salivation. I crave his multigrain baguette, lumpy with cooked grains. At times I’d eat it with a plate of cheeses: brie, camembert, gouda, ... Fresh croissants, quiche Lorraine (spinach or bacon), a plethora of pastries, etcetera. And fresh coffees, all top notch. Their original place by Amocsa is a beautiful open courtyard, usually overflowing with Europeans. They opened a location by central park in 2017. It was a struggle but it survived the 2018 exodus of foreigners, followed by the covid stagnation, and now is beginning to flourish again. I practically lived there half-days until we got wifi.

    Quote Originally Posted by KeyWestPirate View Post
    For those of you who live in civilization and can just go by La Colonia and get a quart of Los Pinos from CR,,
    Hey, we do. At La Union, too, and cheaper

    Pirate, I totally admire your adventures in living on the fringe of civilization. I must say, as you are a movie buff, that you remind me of Harrison Ford in that movie, The Mosquito Coast.

  4. #4
    House SOB Little Corn Tom's Avatar
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    Default Re: Bread

    Did ya ever bake Bahama Bread? It is pretty much the same recipe as other breads, but 3-4 times the "normal" amount of sugar.
    It is delicious. Used to make it all the time but not so much lately. Typical recipe below. And the butter recommendation is spot on.

    Bahamian Bread (Old Eleuthra Recipe)

    Yield: 6 Loaves
    Decades ago, settlement bakers made many loaves at a time. This recipe can be cut in half and 3 loaves will come out nicely. Bahamian Bread is known for its sweetness. The sugar in this recipe is correct! This bread is perfect with a thick layer of Kerrygold salted butter spread on a huge slice. Enjoy!
    3 Packs Instant Yeast
    5lbs Robin Hood All Purpose Flour
    1.5 Cups White Granulated Sugar
    1 Cup Warm Water
    2.5 TBSP Salt
    1 lb Crisco Vegetable Shortening
    2 Cups Fresh Milk
    Mix yeast in the warm water and let stand for about 5 minutes. It should bubble. Add milk, sugar and salt to the yeast mixture.
    Grease Loaf pans with a small amount of Crisco. Set aside.
    In a large mixing bowl combine Crisco and the Robin Hood Flour. Once combined, add in the yeast and milk mixture.
    Prepare a large floured surface. Dump all of the contents of the mixing bowl onto the floured surface. Knead the dough, using a "push and pull" motion until well combined. The dough will be too dry, use additional warm water to combine. Cover the dough with a kitchen cloth and let it rise. It should double in size!
    Cut the dough into 6 even pieces. Knead each piece for about 30 seconds. Roll into a log shape and place each log into a greased loaf pan. Let stand for 30 minutes.
    Bake at 350°F for 45 minutes or until golden brown.
    Life's different here ... It's a whole 'nother pace.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Bread

    Not in Leon, jodido. We’re blessed with the restaurants Pan y Paz run by a French baker and managed by his Dutch wife. Their breads provoke uncontrolled salivation. I crave his multigrain baguette, lumpy with cooked grains. At times I’d eat it with a plate of cheeses: brie, camembert, gouda, ... Fresh croissants, quiche Lorraine (spinach or bacon), a plethora of pastries, etcetera. And fresh coffees, all top notch. Their original place by Amocsa is a beautiful open courtyard, usually overflowing with Europeans.



    I've always wanted to spend some serious time in Leon. I tried to get something going with Krisnia there.

    Clearly the intellectual capitol of NicaVille, Leon would be the place --- if it wasn't so damn hot. We've always had positive experiences there.

    I wouldn't have missed this Nicaragua experience for anything.

    This government craziness is just icing on the cake.

  6. #6
    Viejo del Foro Daddy-YO's Avatar
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    Default Re: Bread

    LCT - That Bahamian Bread Recipe looks to me to be a hybrid pound cake/biscuit. A pound of Crisco is a lot of lard. Is there an unusually high frequency of heart disease in Bahama?

    Tomorrow is Leon's second of the year Griteria, because, back in '48, Cerro Negro did not fully bury Leon in ash, in answer to prayers and because some clerics apparently cut a deal with God for sparing Leon. It promises to be total craziness, well worth avoiding. Streets get packed to overflowing with people from the countryside, going door to door saying, "Who is causing such ecstasy?" to be able to receive treats {like Halloween goodies) before an altar to Maria, Jesus' virgin ma. The churches in Leon have some serious fire power, rocket & mortar bombs that serve as aerial reminders to the neighborhood to wake up and attend mass.

    Last weekend we got caught up in the running of the bulls in Granada, with easily several thousand drunk teenagers, that looked like bandilleros, looking to prove their manhood, or show their 'guts'.

  7. #7
    House SOB Little Corn Tom's Avatar
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    Default Re: Bread

    My grandmother lived 105 years and I never saw her cook anything without getting out a frying pan and put a spatula of Crisco in it.
    Use whatever recipe you want and triple up on the sugar is my best advice.
    Life's different here ... It's a whole 'nother pace.

  8. #8
    Dog Whisperer cookshow's Avatar
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    Default Re: Bread

    I have cooked all my life but never really baked much until I got to Nica, Have 2 neighbors that make/sell Coco Bread and it is amazing but you want some variety.

    For me, I started making pizza, pizza on the Island sucked. Then started playing with bread, have got good over the yrs. Friends rave about my dinner rolls, and they are good, to me at least.

    As mentioned the Kneading is a zen sort of thing, I use a butter knife to stir and my hands to knead, no special appliances.

    I have made lot of bread.
    ‎"You know what you say when people tell you you can't do something? Fool, shut your mouth up!"
    Ernie K Doe

  9. #9
    Viejo del Foro Daddy-YO's Avatar
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    Default Re: Bread

    Pirate - the more I think about you & yours in the hills of Condega with pigs & chickens that have first names, and your pond & spring, fields of beans &/or corn or lord knows what, solar power with backup generators, wifi tower, washer, stove with oven, making bread, and even ice cream -- on the frontier, yet comfortable and secure, I say, the more I think about your situation, esp. in light of current news, you seem to me very well fixed to ride out the coming APOCALYPSE.


    Quote Originally Posted by Little Corn Tom View Post
    My grandmother lived 105 years and I never saw her cook anything without getting out a frying pan and put a spatula of Crisco in it.
    Used for frying, Crisco is very healthy because the food absorbs so little of it at high temperature. But when it comes to eating it wholesale, like in your recipe, it ends up lining arteries, cause it ain't so easily digested.
    See no evil, Hear no evil, Speak no evil: be a wise simian

  10. #10

    Default Re: Bread

    Last weekend we got caught up in the running of the bulls in Granada, with easily several thousand drunk teenagers, that looked like bandilleros, looking to prove their manhood, or show their 'guts'.



    Granada, Nicaragua?
    I've got to get out more!One of the reasons we decided to get rid of (most) of the pigs and chickens was a desire to see more of the country.
    They do keep you down on the farm,, expect to be fed and watered regularly.

    Maybe cows.
    If there is some post election export sanction, it might very well be meat exports.
    Price of cattle will fall.
    https://www.pbs.org/newshour/show/in...igh-human-cost

    This would seem to touch all the bases: no to methane farting cows (new green deal); indigenous rights ; stick it to Orteguista cattle barons; even PETA and the vegetarians would be on board. Or,, could do coffee,, like I originally planned fifteen years ago.

  11. #11

    Default Re: Bread

    Pirate - the more I think about you & yours in the hills of Condega with pigs & chickens that have first names, and your pond & spring, fields of beans &/or corn or lord knows what, solar power with backup generators, wifi tower, washer, stove with oven, making bread, and even ice cream -- on the frontier, yet comfortable and secure, I say, the more I think about your situation, esp. in light of current news, you seem to me very well fixed to ride out the coming APOCALYPSE.


    Well,, yeah,, as long as PriceSmart doesn't shut down.
    Our own electricity and power is huge, means consistent refrigeration.
    I could turn the excess power into hot water. We use propane now but it might not be available.
    The alarms and lights at night keep the vagos at bay.

    Truly, things could go south here.
    We wouldn't starve but it would be very inconvenient.
    Instead of bread we'd be eating corn tortillas, and frying everything in hog fat.
    It's something that we talk about from time to time.
    I try to talk Shelley into stocking up a bit more,, un baril of rice and one of beans
    Maybe sugar.

    Long term: Daniel and Rosario have some agenda, and someone knows what it is.
    Avoiding an end like Pinochet's may be foremost in their minds:

    However, Pinochet was arrested under an international arrest warrant on a visit to London on 10 October 1998 in connection with numerous human rights violations. Following a legal battle, he was released on grounds of ill-health and returned to Chile on 3 March 2000. In 2004, Chilean Judge Juan Guzmán Tapia ruled that Pinochet was medically fit to stand trial and placed him under house arrest.[11] By the time of his death on 10 December 2006, about 300 criminal charges were still pending against him in Chile for numerous human rights violations during his 17-year rule, as well as tax evasion and embezzlement during and after his rule.[28] He was also accused of having corruptly amassed at least US$28 million.[29]

    Recent events go way beyond just getting re-elected. That would have happened anyway.
    He counts the votes.
    If he wanted to add some legitimacy to the theft he could have hired Dominion


    I don't think that Nicaragua could shut down the internet like Cuba did.
    No ATM's, for one thing.

    Still, we've seen some strange stuff in Venezuela. And Cuba. And Syria.
    And I suspect that we are going to see some even stranger stuff in Afghanistan very shortly.


    But, I suppose, like China,, Ortega could block selective url's and shut down any media, Facebook, WhatsApp



    When Shelley left Cuba by plane for Cancun in 2007, we made a phone reservation for her flight.
    No way to pay until you got to the airport.
    There was internet, but only at big hotels for tourists.
    Cubans were not allowed to enter these hotels. Internet was dial up and incredibly slow.

    One of the boats at the Hemingway Marina had an RF modem. We used that to let people know that we were still alive. There was some phone service, from selected kiosks.
    Calls were routed through Canada, and were at least $1/minute. Might have been more.
    There was no direct connection to the US, banking or otherwise.

    You COULD use a Canadian credit card, but at very limited locations.
    I never saw an ATM.

    That was a long time ago,, but it gives one pause.
    One demented finger on the wrong button, and life will get much simpler.

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