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Thread: Obtaining residency

  1. #1

    Default Obtaining residency

    I'm running into what I hope is not a problem.

    In order to obtain residency in Nicaragua, I am told by the consulate in Houston that I need 3 things basically:

    1. Birth certificate
    2. Health report saying I don't have a communicable disease.
    3. Police report saying I'm not a criminal.

    They say that I need to have these three documents authenticated by the Secretary of State, and then translated, and then FedEx'd to the Nicaraguan consulate in Houston, where they will certify it. They will send them back, and then I take these documents to Nicaragua, where I will begin the process of obtaining my residency.

    My question is, has anyone here done this? What does it mean by "authenticated" before translation? I was born in Chicago but live in New Mexico. I have an official birth certificate from the State of Illinois (as opposed to the "birth record" they give you at the hospital). Does this mean that I have to travel all the way to Illinois to get it authenticated? Or is it already authenticated because it has the seal of Illinois?

    This is getting to be a little bit aggravating!

  2. #2
    Santana
    Guest

    Default

    I'd flunk No 3...lol

  3. #3
    Santana
    Guest

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    I think it's authenticated with the seal....at least that's what I think but I have known to be wrong.

    As I recall you can get a copy via the mail....call them up and ask ....

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by bluefire1914 View Post
    I'm running into what I hope is not a problem.

    In order to obtain residency in Nicaragua, I am told by the consulate in Houston that I need 3 things basically:

    1. Birth certificate
    2. Health report saying I don't have a communicable disease.
    3. Police report saying I'm not a criminal.

    They say that I need to have these three documents authenticated by the Secretary of State, and then translated, and then FedEx'd to the Nicaraguan consulate in Houston, where they will certify it. They will send them back, and then I take these documents to Nicaragua, where I will begin the process of obtaining my residency.

    My question is, has anyone here done this? What does it mean by "authenticated" before translation? I was born in Chicago but live in New Mexico. I have an official birth certificate from the State of Illinois (as opposed to the "birth record" they give you at the hospital). Does this mean that I have to travel all the way to Illinois to get it authenticated? Or is it already authenticated because it has the seal of Illinois?

    This is getting to be a little bit aggravating!
    From the Miami Consulate's website:

    REQUIREMENTS TO AUTHENTICATE DOCUMENTS GOING TO NICARAGUA
    All documents must be notarized by a local notary and accompanied with a document signed by the Secretary of State (Apostille) which certifies that the Notary Public is properly registered. Each document must be accompanied by one (1) copy and will then be authenticated by the Consulate of Nicaragua

    Government issued documents like original letters from the US Social Security Administration, US Birth Certificates, Police
    Records, and grade/transcripts or degrees issued by Public Education Institutions (Public Schools or State Universities) do not
    need to be notarized in order to be authenticated by the Consulate. Only the original document and an additional copy is needed for authentication by the Consulate Note: All document translations should be notarized with the Secretary of State Apostille and authenticated by the Consulate.

    After authentication in the Consulate, the document must be authenticated by the Consular Division of the Nicaraguan Ministry of Foreign Relations in Managua prior to being turned in to the appropriate authority/office in Nicaragua.

    COST: Cost is $25.00 (US Dollars Twenty Five) for each document process takes 24 hrs. For rush service (Same day service)
    there is an extra $10 fee per document. All School documents, transcripts, grades or degrees cost $15 for authentication ($10 extra for same day service).
    Mail: Follow above requirements and send Money order or Cashier’s check for the corresponding amount as well as a self-addressed postage paid envelope for us to return the authenticated document to you.

  5. #5

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    They actually have an authentication department at the Secretary of State. When we had ours done we drove to Raleigh in NC and they gave them back to us within a couple of hours. We went and had lunch. It seems like there were certain days they would only do it on. Then we mailed those to the Nicaraguan Embassy in DC with a pre-paid fed-ex envelope to ensure getting them back ASAP.
    I don't know how it is now, but six years ago we also had to have a certain amount of "income" authenticated through our bank records and also our marriage license and passports authenticated.
    It is much easier to do all of this while you are in the US. But if you have everything authenticated from the Nicaragua Embassy when you get here, then it is a breeze. It only took us two days to get our temperory residency. We had to wait a few months for them to get the photo machine working to get our plastic cards.

  6. #6

    Default

    Thanks for the input, everyone. It is very clear to me now. I really appreciate it. However, from one of your responses, a new question popped up:

    Quote Originally Posted by Donna View Post
    I don't know how it is now, but six years ago we also had to have a certain amount of "income" authenticated through our bank records and also our marriage license and passports authenticated.
    I only need my marriage license authenticated and translated if I'm married to a Nica, right? My wife and I are both United States citizens, so we don't need to bring a marriage license down with us, do we?

  7. #7

    Default Residency-Marriage Cert

    I did everything in Nicaragua with the American Embassy's Consular Dept.

    They notarize your documents, which thereby authenticates them.

    I am married to a Nica who is also a US citizen. I had our marriage certificate authenticated and translated.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lisa View Post

    I am married to a Nica who is also a US citizen. I had our marriage certificate authenticated and translated.
    In our particular case, neither one of us is a Nica. I'm Spanish, she's Italian. So do we still need to bring a marriage certificate? I don't see why we would?

  9. #9
    TRN's fiesty redhead catahoula fan's Avatar
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    Yes, you must have your marriage certificate. Don't ask me why, the Nica system just LOVES lots of paperwork. Bring it, you'll need it. We didn't have ours authenticated or translated, just had to show the original document, and that was enough.
    "Patience is a virtue, but persistence to the point of success is a blessing."

  10. #10

    Default

    Ok, well that's good to know. I'd hate to have the Nicaraguan government think that we are living in sin.

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bluefire1914 View Post
    Thanks for the input, everyone. It is very clear to me now. I really appreciate it. However, from one of your responses, a new question popped up:



    I only need my marriage license authenticated and translated if I'm married to a Nica, right? My wife and I are both United States citizens, so we don't need to bring a marriage license down with us, do we?

    No. My husband and I are both US citizens. We had to give them an authenticated marriage license.
    I had a document noterized at the embassy once and it cost me $95.00 and half a day.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Donna View Post
    No. My husband and I are both US citizens. We had to give them an authenticated marriage license.
    I had a document noterized at the embassy once and it cost me $95.00 and half a day.
    $95 for a document! I had a few documents notarized at the embassy in March and it was about $30 per. Hope no one was pulling your leg over there!

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by 3 frijoles View Post
    $95 for a document! I had a few documents notarized at the embassy in March and it was about $30 per. Hope no one was pulling your leg over there!

    This was about two years ago and a consulant notarized it. It was only one document but two signatures. I though it was terrible but we had to have it done and fed-ex back home. I remember because you also have to have US Dollars and we only had Cordobas. Or was it the other way around. Anyway I had to go out to get the right kind of money.

  14. #14

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    yeah. its usually US dollars. maybe there was some special reason for the high price. Most of the items I have ever had Notarized over there have been about U$30, I think a few years back I paid U$20 per, but the rates keep going up.

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by 3 frijoles View Post
    yeah. its usually US dollars. maybe there was some special reason for the high price. Most of the items I have ever had Notarized over there have been about U$30, I think a few years back I paid U$20 per, but the rates keep going up.

    Well I am really glad to know that a notary is not always that high. I may need one again and hopefully it will be cheaper next time.

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Donna View Post
    Well I am really glad to know that a notary is not always that high. I may need one again and hopefully it will be cheaper next time.
    I hope so too! A few papers I will need to take care of soon over there.

  17. #17

    Default The consulate..

    has to be the one nearest to where the document originated. I did all of mine at the San Francisco one , but my wife was born in Boston and had to go to the one in New York for her birth certificate. If you get a notarized copy of your Drivers License and have the Secretary of state do the apostille on it supposedly it will be easier to get your Nica DL, same with a gun permit if you are so inclined. Also any of your documents that are not State certified (like income verification ), get a notarized translated copy and an apostille from the Secretary of State, then the consulate certification
    tree hugging, dirt worshiping, Birkenstock wearing, Bill of Rights supporting, enemy of censorship

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