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Thread: Brutal Taxi Robbery of Canadian man

  1. #1

    Default Brutal Taxi Robbery of Canadian man

    http://www.laprensa.com.ni/archivo/2...s/266433.shtml



    Jim McCormick of 64 years old from Canada, an English teacher was robbed on Monday evening.

    He had left the Restaurant "La Marsellesa" in Los Robles at around 9pm. The taxi passed by the BDF in Altamira and picked up 2 men, who immediately began beating the crap out of him. He said that they held him in the taxi for upwards of 1 hour.

    Took his wallet with his credit cards and his debit cards, apparently he had a paper with his pin numbers on it within the wallet as well. He was then dropped off in a dark spot with no people in Villa Fontana.

    McCormick said that he recalls the taxi was an old grey Hyundai and the engine sounded pretty bad.

  2. #2
    Viejo del Foro El Greco's Avatar
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    Default

    That happen to a guy I know! it is a Gang of thugs that work with thetaxi driver, They pick up the victim and than 2 man jump aboard and rob the victim.
    Dios es Amor!

  3. #3
    Former SJDS Bureau Chief, TRN Danpolley's Avatar
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    Default It has happened to friends of

    mine as well. In my friends case, one of them was stabbed, but after a stay in the hospital, recovered, at least physically.
    Sometimes I think I understand everything, then I regain consciousness.

  4. #4

    Default

    There was an incident last year, when I felt that something was going to happen, the taxi driver started asking me a handful of questions relating to $'s, where I lived, etc. I do not like to make small talk with the taxi drivers, I have heard to many incidents of them taking this info to their "friends".

    I answered them by saying that I was broke and told him I lived in another poor part of town. Then he made a phone call, and told the person on the other line that he had to make one more stop and drop a passanger off (me) and then he would come pick him up. He started driving off in another direction which was not the direction I needed to go, so I told him I was getting out early, he seemed a bit nervous when I asked for him to pull over, but let me go asking for the full passage. I paid him in full something like 40 cords, and was tempted to rip his taxi certificate from his front window, with all of his information and picture, but I figured the best bet was not to cause a situation. So I ended up getting another taxi to where I was going and paid twice what I planned to.

    Several facilities where there are tourists and more money passes have set up cameras to record the taxi's picking up their passangers. Galerias Santo Domingo does this because of several incidents that have occured to those taking taxi's from the mall.

  5. #5

    Default It pays to be alert...

    you did well there.

    I either travel with the more expensive hotel drivers at Las Mercedes or my friend Henry Colado Serrano, (505) 678-6891, he speaks a little english, very nice guy,family man, coaches three little league teams. He usually is working at the airport, a quick call and he will be there. No air conditioned limo but an honest man who charges a fair price. Equipment or monetary donations for the teams are most welcome too.
    tree hugging, dirt worshiping, Birkenstock wearing, Bill of Rights supporting, enemy of censorship

  6. #6
    Dog Whisperer cookshow's Avatar
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    Default

    Expect to see more of this type of crime as the economy worsens, this is not only crime against gringos, I know several Nica's this has happened too. I have become pretty acquainted with MGA & know which direction I should be going, I do not hesitate to get out of a cab if I get a bad feeling, life is too short. I cringe when I see people leaving the airport & catching a cab on the street, they have no idea where they are going & the cab drivers can see that they are carrying lots of stuff (usually tucked safely away in the trunk).

  7. #7

    Default

    I take between 4-6 taxis and buses per day in Managua. Calling taxi's I know tends to be out of the question, because they will cost more and because it takes more time waiting for them, however I have a few very nice taxis on file just in case I need a clean ride with a good driver.

    I think this happens much more to Nicaraguans than gringos. It happened recently to my wifes cousin and several of her girlfriends who went out for a night in town, taxi dropped most of them off to their intended destinations, the last 2 were kept and robbed by aquaintances of the taxi guy, fortunately no one was injured.

  8. #8
    TRN Surgeon General El Doc's Avatar
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    This has been a problem in Mexico for many years now. The solution we've come up with is to call someone on your cell when a taxi picks you up. Relay the license plate number and the name of the driver to someone before you depart. You can also text message the number to someone. I did the same thing when taking taxis in Nica, but it cost me an international call to my wife each time. I always make a point of doing this where the driver can see me. Seems to be a good deterrent and certainly couldn't hurt.
    "Un Estado que no se rigiera según la justicia se reduciría a una gran banda de ladrones." --San Agustín

  9. #9
    Para aquí para acá Jonh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by El Doc View Post
    This has been a problem in Mexico for many years now. The solution we've come up with is to call someone on your cell when a taxi picks you up. Relay the license plate number and the name of the driver to someone before you depart. You can also text message the number to someone. I did the same thing when taking taxis in Nica, but it cost me an international call to my wife each time. I always make a point of doing this where the driver can see me. Seems to be a good deterrent and certainly couldn't hurt.
    Good solution. I know it's a risk, but why not just make it a pretend phone call, for the deterrent effect?

  10. #10
    TRN Surgeon General El Doc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by John View Post
    Good solution. I know it's a risk, but why not just make it a pretend phone call, for the deterrent effect?
    Actually, one several occasions, I have.

    I think I'll rely on the liberal concealed weapons laws in Nicaragua. It's amazing what a 9 mm hole in the frontal lobe will do to a criminal's mindset.
    "Un Estado que no se rigiera según la justicia se reduciría a una gran banda de ladrones." --San Agustín

  11. #11
    Dog Whisperer cookshow's Avatar
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    I have made the fake calls too, making it obvious that I was relaying info on the cab I was in. Has worked so far, when I am in MGA I take several cabs a day, some days I do use a driver or known cab drivers, but sometimes it is just too much trouble for a short trip.

  12. #12

    Default

    fake calls sound like a good option. Weapons, I am very leary of, I just don't want to be the guy that gets stabbed with his own knife or shot with his own gun.

  13. #13
    Pinolero De Cepa!! FisherCigarman's Avatar
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    Default good boy doc

    Thats exactly what I do,when I travel outside of Esteli,hell one time when driving back from Casares,there was a drunk Bus driver who would not let us pass,and almost threw us off the road I manage to pass him and when doing so he got a glymse of my gun I had placed on the dash board on purpose. I think the guy $$hited on his pants and about slammed on the brakes and let us go by
    Believe me,unless you are a whole gang,you DONt wanna mess with us when we go out fishing,since we always carry 3 guns a rifle and a shotgun,and we know how to use then too

    Quote Originally Posted by El Doc View Post
    Actually, one several occasions, I have.

    I think I'll rely on the liberal concealed weapons laws in Nicaragua. It's amazing what a 9 mm hole in the frontal lobe will do to a criminal's mindset.

  14. #14

    Default i didn't know they had it....

    Quote Originally Posted by El Doc View Post
    Actually, one several occasions, I have.

    I think I'll rely on the liberal concealed weapons laws in Nicaragua. It's amazing what a 9 mm hole in the frontal lobe will do to a criminal's mindset.
    we have conservative concealed weapons laws in texas. you can use deadly force in your vehicle, place of employment and home! i had thought i would carry a taser gun in nica, shoots a dart with electricity. jpjw said don't kill anyone in nica.
    All this for a flag? Michelle Obama http://hotair.com/archives/2011/11/0...our-years-ago/

  15. #15

    Default when i move down there...

    Quote Originally Posted by FisherCigarman View Post
    Thats exactly what I do,when I travel outside of Esteli,hell one time when driving back from Casares,there was a drunk Bus driver who would not let us pass,and almost threw us off the road I manage to pass him and when doing so he got a glymse of my gun I had placed on the dash board on purpose. I think the guy $$hited on his pants and about slammed on the brakes and let us go by
    Believe me,unless you are a whole gang,you DONt wanna mess with us when we go out fishing,since we always carry 3 guns a rifle and a shotgun,and we know how to use then too
    first thing i am gonna do is take you fishing.... so i can learn the pacific coast gun rules.....
    All this for a flag? Michelle Obama http://hotair.com/archives/2011/11/0...our-years-ago/

  16. #16

    Default

    I know it has been discussed before but to refresh my memory what is the best way to get a quality gun in Nicaragua. Also the" law" about guns.

  17. #17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by El Doc View Post
    This has been a problem in Mexico for many years now.
    That was my first brief when I landed in DF - NEVER, EVER, NUNCA hop in a green Volkswagen! I always took hotel cars when I needed to go somewhere. Hell, taxis in Bogota are safer than taxis in Mexico City. And well, I hope this latest incident in Nicaragua is targeted strictly at (drum roll) Canadians!


    Oh c'mon, all my Canadian friends know I am joking! Now get me some bacon and beer before we take over Toronto.

  18. #18
    TRN Surgeon General El Doc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thunderdial View Post
    That was my first brief when I landed in DF - NEVER, EVER, NUNCA hop in a green Volkswagen! I always took hotel cars when I needed to go somewhere. Hell, taxis in Bogota are safer than taxis in Mexico City. And well, I hope this latest incident in Nicaragua is targeted strictly at (drum roll) Canadians!


    Oh c'mon, all my Canadian friends know I am joking! Now get me some bacon and beer before we take over Toronto.
    I think a taxi in Baghdad is safer than Mexico City right now, and that's taking the IEDs into account! It's really a shame because I love Mexico City. The whole country has turned into a war zone.

    I was really kind of hoping that the Canadians would take over instead of the other way around. Sure would save me a $hitload on health insurance for the kids.
    "Un Estado que no se rigiera según la justicia se reduciría a una gran banda de ladrones." --San Agustín

  19. #19
    Para aquí para acá Jonh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bradley40550 View Post
    I know it has been discussed before but to refresh my memory what is the best way to get a quality gun in Nicaragua. Also the" law" about guns.
    When we get this info, it'll make a good "sticky" or FAQ.

  20. #20
    Dog Whisperer cookshow's Avatar
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    There are several gun shops in MGA with all the stuff you want, but the prices are high. To buy a gun "legally" you must have a cedula & then get a permit for each weapon you own. I believe that now you must also take a gun safety class to get the permit.

  21. #21
    Fightin Irish JackMcG's Avatar
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    Default Some thoughts

    I lived in Granada for almost 2 years and have also lived in Diriomo and Guanacaste (near Diriomo). I have never been assaulted physically but have been verbally harrassed quite a few times and had few near misses. A couple of times, I was the one doing the assaulting after being fed up with the verbal altercation. I have had my pocket picked for a couple hundred bucks. I know that I have been "sized up" many times to be mugged but for various reasons, it didn't come to pass. And I have been threatened second hand by someone delivering a message from some "pandilleros" in the area who were taking more than an interest in my comings and goings. This was dissuaded by casually mentioning, to the messenger,that I had to go clean my shotgun. I don't have a shotgun in Nicaragua but no one else knew that. My wife is Nicaraguan so I am permanently tied to the country. When we are there, I know that I am constantly "on guard" with myself and those around me. Whether on the bus or in a taxi or walking in the street. When I have to carry a lot of money and am completely tense and extremely cautious. One of the things I really enjoy about returning to the states is being able to walk down the street without someone asking me for money. It's sad but I find myself altering my routes in Nicaragua just to avoid areas, where I know the "aggressive" beggers are. I find it very, very hard to relax in Nicaragua. I also believe that the incidence of crime has increased over the last few years and will continue to do so with the increase in poverty, due to high food and fuel prices, and the huge lack of opportunity to work there. My wife and I, lately have been spending 4 months (wintertime usa) in Nic and 8 in the States to work. We have discussed the idea to continue to do that for a few more years and then retire in Nic. However, I feel that Nicaragua may no longer be a place where I can enjoy my older years. Presently, I am in my fifties and in good physical shape so I feel I can pretty much hold my own if a problem would arise where I would need to defend myself or my wife. But I am not getting any younger and the older I get, the more I realize I become a "potential" target for people with criminal intent. So between the combination of conditions worsening in Nica and my getting older and less capable, I am beginning to feel that I might have to rethink my plans. Just the idea that I might have to get a gun permit and carry a concealed (or not so concealed) weapon on me, on a daily basis, gives me pause. The idea that I need to resort to various "tricks" with taxi drivers and others just to keep myself safe gives me pause. The idea that I could never leave my home without having someone "guard" it for me while I was away, gives me pause. The idea that, as a Gringo, I am looked upon as a walking bankroll (and a target) by venders, taxistas, petty and not so petty crooks and various other "opportunistic" people gives me pause. It's interesting to read so many posts on here that take all this for "normal" and just the cost of choosing to live in Nicaragua. And if I would have to live in a "gated community", I might as well just live in the US. It's true that "Nicaragua is not for everyone"... and it seems each year that it's less and less for me. It's sad and it's a shame. But I think that when I retire, I will want to also "relax".
    "If you ain't bleeding, you ain't working!"

  22. #22

    Default

    I look at the stress factors in the US and Nicaragua.

    I can either shorten my life with trying to figure out how to pay for the bills and Taxes in the US

    or

    I can shorten my life with the stress worrying about who might be behind me or who wants to sneak into my house in Nicaragua.

    -----------

    One thing that is begining to worry me about Nicaragua is that the cost factor could one day reach a point where its as stressful as the US, in that case the US would look like the place to least shorten my life. but then I am very tied to Nicaragua through my wife and children so only way I am leaving is if they leave with me.

  23. #23
    Viejo del Foro Just Plain John Wayne's Avatar
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    I believe JMc it would be not much different than living in an inner city in the states...My thoughts are to be a difficult nut to crack, make the bad guy´s go look and easyier target, there are all kinds of electronic servailance systems for sale and all kinds of ways to leave suttle messages...(dead falls) to discourage even the most determined of them....I really do not worry to much, since I made a few of them comment about the gringo on the block at one of their union meetings...Don´t F*ck with the gringo, he will hurt you....going some places alone and or drinking is just asking for it in many neighborhoods...Your common sence got you this far in life, forget the worrying... just keep your eyes open and use that good brain God gave you....When you look outside your house remember....Its a jungle out there and plenty of wild animals on the hunt...Nowhere here will their be a police responce like in the USA, but then again look at the difference in cost, as in TAXES.....
    To be called a "Has Been" I must surmise, is much Greater than to be called a "Nevah Been"... JW...



  24. #24

    Default i appreciate

    all posts on this thread, as security is a serious issue. i will attempt to use several layers of security to make my home a hard target.
    All this for a flag? Michelle Obama http://hotair.com/archives/2011/11/0...our-years-ago/

  25. #25

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Demento View Post
    all posts on this thread, as security is a serious issue. i will attempt to use several layers of security to make my home a hard target.
    You could dig a small tunnel to the side of the cliff and drop a rope ladder when you need to escape

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