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Thread: Corn Island - Material Prices

  1. #1
    Dog Whisperer cookshow's Avatar
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    Default Corn Island - Material Prices

    Here are yesterday's prices, but no one has any (or much) to sell & the boats can't load in Rama due to some flooding or some such, so these may already be outdated.

    4" blocks - 20 each
    6" blocks - 22 each
    cement-220 bag
    3/8 rebar 1530 quintal
    1/4 rebar 1450 quintal

    There is some difference in price depending on where you buy here, but this is a pretty good average.

  2. #2
    Dog Whisperer cookshow's Avatar
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    Default

    Prices as of a few days ago.

    Blocks - Same
    Cement - Same
    3/8 rebar 1630 quintal (up a 100)
    1/4 rebar - Same
    Sand - 1500 meter
    Piedrin (gravel) - 1750 meter
    Nails - 28 lb

  3. #3
    House SOB Little Corn Tom's Avatar
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    Default What is a

    Quintal?
    Life's different here ... It's a whole 'nother pace.

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    TRN's fiesty redhead catahoula fan's Avatar
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    Default

    Means roughly 100 pounds, in this case rebar. I say roughly, 'cause nothing's exact down here.
    "Patience is a virtue, but persistence to the point of success is a blessing."

  5. #5
    Dog Whisperer cookshow's Avatar
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    Default

    Quintal is another one of those things like a meter. I think there are 13-14 pieces of rod (approx 20' in length) in a quintal of 3/8", will have to check on the 1/4", those are the primary sizes used here. they use the 1/4" to "tie" the 3/8" for making post. corners, etc. I still want to see them weigh 13-14 pieces of 20' rod, that would be a good show, even weighing one would be interesting. Feels like a hundred pounds when you carry it, but I say the same thing of anything over 50lbs.

  6. #6
    Para aquí para acá Jonh's Avatar
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    It's a hundred "somethings." Wikipedia says,

    The quintal or centner is a historical unit of mass with many different definitions in different countries, but usually it is 100 base units of mass, e.g. pounds.

    Both terms share their roots in the Classical Latin centenarius, meaning hundredlike, but the quintal has a convoluted etymology: It became Late Latin centenarium pondus, then in succession, Late Greek, kentenarion, Arabic, qintar, Mediæval Latin, quintale, and finally Old French quintal before passing into the English language. The word centner, on the other hand, is just a Germanicized form of centenarius.

    The unit was and still is used in the Arab world, where it is known as the qintar. It is currently defined informally as 50 kg. The qintar was reimported to Europe by traders.

    In France it used to be defined as 100 livres (pounds), about 48.95 kg, and has later been redefined as 100 kg (mesures usuelles), thus called metric quintal with symbol q. In Spain it is still defined as 100 libras, or about 46 kg, and in Portugal as 128 libras or about 58.75 kg. In English both, quintal and centner, were once alternate names for the hundredweight and thus defined either as 100 lb (exactly 45.359237 kg) or as 112 lb (about 50.84 kg). Also, in Dominican Republic it is about 125 lb.

    In India, the quintal is equivalent to 100 kg and is a standard measurement of mass for agricultural products.

    The quintal was defined in the United States in 1866[1] as 100 kilograms. However, this is not in use and though it still appears in the statute, it has been declared obsolete by NIST.[2]

    100 kilograms centner and "centner per hectare" were also common units used in Soviet Union's agriculture and are used now in ex-USSR states.
    If you want to watch Nicas talk and talk for hours, ask two of them to tell you how long a vara is.

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