Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: New Ferry to Ometepe

  1. #1

    Default New Ferry to Ometepe

    http://www.laprensa.com.ni/archivo/2...s/293096.shtml



    This new boat has been waiting for the Rio San Juan to fill up enough so that it could make its way into Lago Cocibolca, for more than 2 1/2 months. It is now at the new port in Altagracia, San Jose del Sur.

    "El Rey del Cocibolca", will be captained by the Ometepe Island native, Donald Jarquín.

    The municipality of Altagracia paid 306,000 Euros for the boat, and another 270,000 Euros to get the boat from Holland to Nicaragua.

    This Ferry has a capacity of 1,000 people, 4 cargo trucks of plantains or fruit, and 4 smaller cars.

    Engineers of the "Universidad Nacional de Ingeniería" (UNI) came to the island yesterday to develop the design of the ramp to load the cargo aboard. After the design of the ramp the boat must first go to "El Diamante" of Granada where some final details will be completed to begin serving the people.

    There will be 3 trips per day back and fourth between Altagracia and San Jorge. This is expected to begin towards mid November of this year.

    As of yet no official price of fare has been given, but they expect that it will be less than the 60 cords that is charged for ferries that go from Moyogalpa to San Jorge, and a bit more than 30 cordobas which the small boats charge.

    The second phase of the construction to the new port as San Jose del Sur, with a cost of 15 million cordobas will begin next week. This will include parking, offices, and wharehouses.

  2. #2
    Junkyard Dog randude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    PNW
    Posts
    3,148
    Blog Entries
    7

    Default

    The price of the boat was not too bad, but the delivery cost was horrible. They should have gotten a builder closer to home. I see a ton of boat or ship building opportunities there. I was thinking about a motor barge to Little Corn Island as a business
    Survivor

  3. #3
    Viejo del Foro bikingo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Brookings OR
    Posts
    1,078

    Default

    If you want to buy a shrimper or a workboat under 100 feet you can get excellent deals in the Gulf or east coast but if you want to build ferries tugs etc. it's hard to beat the Dutch. Their subsidized by their government and they offer an excellent product; were it not for the Jones act prohibiting documented vessels over 10 net tons to operate in the US, many here including yours truly would have boats built in Europe.
    Just because of the price of sandblasting or foaming the inside of a steel boat is so prohibitive in the US many West Coast fishermen go to Ensenada to have this work done for a third of the price and then you can fuel up on your way home and save thousands more.
    The Dutch also corner the third world market on quays, breakwaters, piers etc., not because of superior work but because of the aggresive Dutch policy of subsidizing foriegn contracts under the guise of benevolent development. Oh and the Dutch politicians can sit on the board of the companies involved, conflict of interest is considered a joke among Dutch nationals.

  4. #4
    Para aquí para acá Jonh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    La Florida
    Posts
    16,712
    Blog Entries
    15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bikingo View Post
    If you want to buy a shrimper or a workboat under 100 feet you can get excellent deals in the Gulf or east coast but if you want to build ferries tugs etc. it's hard to beat the Dutch. Their subsidized by their government and they offer an excellent product; were it not for the Jones act prohibiting documented vessels over 10 net tons to operate in the US, many here including yours truly would have boats built in Europe.
    Just because of the price of sandblasting or foaming the inside of a steel boat is so prohibitive in the US many West Coast fishermen go to Ensenada to have this work done for a third of the price and then you can fuel up on your way home and save thousands more.
    The Dutch also corner the third world market on quays, breakwaters, piers etc., not because of superior work but because of the aggresive Dutch policy of subsidizing foriegn contracts under the guise of benevolent development. Oh and the Dutch politicians can sit on the board of the companies involved, conflict of interest is considered a joke among Dutch nationals.
    Plus they can smoke pot all day long.

  5. #5
    House SOB Little Corn Tom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pompano Beach, Florida
    Posts
    10,336
    Blog Entries
    5

    Default The best barge ...

    that I ever saw coming into LCI was the "St. Nicholas". It was big and ran right up onto the beach where the bow dropped down like a landing craft. Then you could drive a truck or tractor and trailer off or perhaps a trailer with a small container on it. Or it could house a fork lift and handle some pallets.

    Of course this would change the dynamics of the island entirely and would be a bad thing for those of us who want to be the "last guy".

    The next best thing would be a WWII landing craft.

    The current ferry to LCI is about a 35 foot long panga that really beats you up but is fast and takes about 30 minutes. A better solution is a 50 foot diesel trawler that has a cover for wet trips and can handle cargo as well as passengers. Slow but economical and dry.

    Quote Originally Posted by randude View Post
    The price of the boat was not too bad, but the delivery cost was horrible. They should have gotten a builder closer to home. I see a ton of boat or ship building opportunities there. I was thinking about a motor barge to Little Corn Island as a business
    Life's different here ... It's a whole 'nother pace.

  6. #6
    Para aquí para acá Jonh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    La Florida
    Posts
    16,712
    Blog Entries
    15

    Default

    How about a hovercraft?

  7. #7
    TRN Surgeon General El Doc's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    La Gran Nada, Departamento Granada
    Posts
    5,638
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by randude View Post
    The price of the boat was not too bad, but the delivery cost was horrible. They should have gotten a builder closer to home. I see a ton of boat or ship building opportunities there. I was thinking about a motor barge to Little Corn Island as a business
    Clearly its used. You're not going to get that much steel for that price new. I imagine delivery of a ferry across an ocean would be terribly expensive and dangerous; they're not exactly build for the open ocean. Can they even carry enough fuel for the crossing, or do they have to bring a tender along (why hire one crew when you can hire two at twice the price)?

    Hey Randude, if you're looking to get away and still make some bank, the Argentine shipbuilding industry is undergoing a revival after a 15 year hiatus. They're even bringing the old timers out of retirement to teach the skills to the new guys. I bet with a little marketing, you could sell your skills for a nice price.

    BTW, Argentina is wonderful!
    "Un Estado que no se rigiera según la justicia se reduciría a una gran banda de ladrones." --San Agustín

  8. #8
    TRN Surgeon General El Doc's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    La Gran Nada, Departamento Granada
    Posts
    5,638
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by John View Post
    How about a hovercraft?
    How about an old LST? The U.S. has got to have a bunch sitting around in mothballs, and I'm sure they could use a tax deduction!

    "Un Estado que no se rigiera según la justicia se reduciría a una gran banda de ladrones." --San Agustín

  9. #9
    Junkyard Dog randude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    PNW
    Posts
    3,148
    Blog Entries
    7

    Default

    Most hovercraft are not very practical. They take so much energy to hover and the really only work in still water.
    Survivor

  10. #10

    Default

    there are those cargo haulers that are pretty fancy the middle of the boat sinks like an enormous dry dock, and then the water is pumped out and it raises back up again with the cargo on top. This one doesn't seem to be to complicated either http://www.dejongandlebet.com/949%20Dockwise.JPG

    Quote Originally Posted by El Doc View Post
    Clearly its used. You're not going to get that much steel for that price new. I imagine delivery of a ferry across an ocean would be terribly expensive and dangerous; they're not exactly build for the open ocean. Can they even carry enough fuel for the crossing, or do they have to bring a tender along (why hire one crew when you can hire two at twice the price)?

    Hey Randude, if you're looking to get away and still make some bank, the Argentine shipbuilding industry is undergoing a revival after a 15 year hiatus. They're even bringing the old timers out of retirement to teach the skills to the new guys. I bet with a little marketing, you could sell your skills for a nice price.

    BTW, Argentina is wonderful!

Similar Threads

  1. Infrastructure on Ometepe
    By El Doc in forum Homesteading in Nicaragua
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 10-10-2008, 11:46 AM
  2. Ometepe volcanic activity
    By Lisa in forum Today, in Nicaragua...
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 12-20-2007, 08:02 PM
  3. Ometepe, Online Magazine
    By tresfrijoles in forum Tourism Activities and General Travel Issues
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 12-04-2007, 03:12 PM
  4. Ometepe
    By tresfrijoles in forum Tourism Activities and General Travel Issues
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11-02-2007, 11:14 AM
  5. Ometepe hotels?
    By austinreed in forum Transportation and Lodging
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-08-2007, 09:30 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Also visit the False Bluff Blog!