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Thread: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

  1. #26

    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    Kevin and MizBrown are correct. We were looking at the BCS 722. If there are Chinese versions for sale in MGA that is something I wish I knew more about. We already have a $2000 chipper with no engine, so we have to buy a small engine.

    Mowing is being done by machetes now. I have suggested that scythes are better, but I'm going to have to prove it before people believe me. The farm owner was thinking about buying a DR field and brush mower or something like that. We won't be getting a riding tractor anytime soon, but we will probably get horses and oxen.

    We have two main objectives for mowing. 1. Create clear lanes down which to run temporary electric fence. 2. To clear away dry and undesirable forages and make way for new growth. Right now the second objective his handled by machetes or fire. Part of my job is to figure out another way.

    Our only full time worker is about 20 years old. He is a good cowboy, but I doubt if he would grow a garden just because we had a rototiller. It seems like a worker with a walking tractor would be in a lot of demand by the neighbors. If there was some way to work things out to everyone's benefit.

    Driving through Mexico sounds like fun to me. I would spend the night in hotels along the way. However, the plan only works if the truck would sell. Our farm is barely accessible by off-road vehicles during the dry season, we won't be keeping a truck. The farm is about 170 mzas, 25 miles south of Boaco, near the Rio Negro.

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    Dog Whisperer cookshow's Avatar
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    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    The walking tractor I saw (the only one I have ever seen here) was at John May Company in MGA, they deal in everything Diesel. Talked to the owner about it. I first saw it 4-5 years ago after Dud told me about seeing it, a few years ago I went back for a closer look, it was still there. They really did not know anything about it, some salesman had dumped it on them as a floor model or something, no attachments and it looked like maybe some peices were missing. I noted the make and model and looked it up on the internet when I got home. I think they wanted around $2,000 for it if I remember correctly, but I also got the impression they were willing to negotiate. My guess is that it is still there.

    I have had other people tell me they have seen them in Nicaragua, but that is the only sighting I can confirm.

    I would rather try to get Italian parts through a USA distributor than Chinese parts from a Nicaraguan Distributor, I can almost guarantee it would be easier to get the parts on the Italian model which I think is owned by Kohler now.
    ‎"You know what you say when people tell you you can't do something? Fool, shut your mouth up!"
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  3. #28
    The Bard of Jinotega MizBrown's Avatar
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    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    Quote Originally Posted by Little Corn Tom View Post
    This is the most versatile farm implement ever designed, built or sold......EVER!

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/1953-Ford-Ju...item3376e51446


    My uncle wished he'd died on his planting corn just before his 84th birthday. Unfortunately, in his opinion, he lived through the heart attack and can't farm anymore (tied to an oxygen tank). In the day, he ran a 4 foot stone mill off the PTO, and ground malt for moonshiners, flour for his niece, mealy for visiting Africans, and probably ran his sorghum mill off the thing, though that was could have been a different machine. You can get all sorts of attachments for it, or if your neighbors have some and you have others, you can switch work.

    I think my uncle's was also a Ford, but John Deeres are good, too, and the suckers just last and last.

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    The Bard of Jinotega MizBrown's Avatar
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    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    Quote Originally Posted by benharpo View Post
    Kevin and MizBrown are correct. We were looking at the BCS 722. If there are Chinese versions for sale in MGA that is something I wish I knew more about. We already have a $2000 chipper with no engine, so we have to buy a small engine.

    Mowing is being done by machetes now. I have suggested that scythes are better, but I'm going to have to prove it before people believe me. The farm owner was thinking about buying a DR field and brush mower or something like that. We won't be getting a riding tractor anytime soon, but we will probably get horses and oxen.

    We have two main objectives for mowing. 1. Create clear lanes down which to run temporary electric fence. 2. To clear away dry and undesirable forages and make way for new growth. Right now the second objective his handled by machetes or fire. Part of my job is to figure out another way.

    Our only full time worker is about 20 years old. He is a good cowboy, but I doubt if he would grow a garden just because we had a rototiller. It seems like a worker with a walking tractor would be in a lot of demand by the neighbors. If there was some way to work things out to everyone's benefit.

    Driving through Mexico sounds like fun to me. I would spend the night in hotels along the way. However, the plan only works if the truck would sell. Our farm is barely accessible by off-road vehicles during the dry season, we won't be keeping a truck. The farm is about 170 mzas, 25 miles south of Boaco, near the Rio Negro.
    Small engines are available all over the place -- the store that had had rototillers had those in stock.

    With a diesel engine and bad roads, you're looking at hauling fuel up to the farm by four wheel drive in good weather and by ox cart maybe in bad.

    Most farm people are very conservative because they've learned what works for their climate and soil and what didn't kill them off over the centuries. If you can show them that an expensive scythe (I've priced them and I find them expensive) that they'd have to learn how to use would work better than the cheaper machetes that they know how to use, they'll switch if you buy the scythes. Scythes tend to be more fragile than machetes and need a different sharpening gear (stone not a file, I think). I've done a bit of that work and get the impression it's better for less brushy vegetation and even better for cradling wheat (my father's experience).

    http://scythesupply.com/blades.htm -- these may be on the high end of what scythes go for, but I've never heard of scythes being cheaper than machetes or sickles.


    My uncle basically operated his own machinery. The tenants were for hand labor: priming tobacco, feeding pigs, throwing bales of straw on a wagon. Never saw one of his tenants on his tractor that I can remember and I lived there ten years and had visited summers before that. You will be amazed at what farm help can do with machinery (I worked on a duck farm for a while and one of the women turned the riding mower over in a ditch, others delivered cracked eggs to the egg washer (I cracked as many eggs as anyone, but threw them back to the ducks, so I looked good).

    The guys will see how fast your walk behind tractor can go; they're going to borrow it and see if it will run a masa mill with the PTO, or any number of very amusing things, including stealing it. A full sized tractor is a bit harder to get up in the bed of a pickup truck and hide with a tarp.

  5. #30
    House SOB Little Corn Tom's Avatar
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    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    My grandpa taught me how to drive his Ford 8N when I was just a kid and I loved it.

    Bought one of my own 20 years later and it served me well for 5 years.

    Farming was just too hard.
    Life's different here ... It's a whole 'nother pace.

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    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    Quote Originally Posted by Little Corn Tom View Post
    My grandpa taught me how to drive his Ford 8N when I was just a kid and I loved it.

    Bought one of my own 20 years later and it served me well for 5 years.

    Farming was just too hard.
    At 5 yrs of age ('71) I rode home from a farm auction of the fender of a massey 35 . At 10 yrs of age it was mine to move palets, plow snow bush hog grass and scoop soil..

    I used it constantly until I was 24. I then switched to part time greenhouse work and only used it intermittently until it was sold in 2005 for almost the same amount (non inflation adjusted dollars) as it was bought for in '71.

    While my Dad still has a Massey 35 (diesel and another slightly larger forget the number).. I do miss that tractor..


    Most of the tractors I see in Nica are Belarus.. Not familiar with them, but Dad says they are the worst Tractors on the planet..
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    The Bard of Jinotega MizBrown's Avatar
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    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    Quote Originally Posted by Little Corn Tom View Post
    My grandpa taught me how to drive his Ford 8N when I was just a kid and I loved it.

    Bought one of my own 20 years later and it served me well for 5 years.

    Farming was just too hard.

    Reading about farming in books, though, is really a lot of fun. I know better, yet one of the last books I bought before coming here was one of the John Seymour homesteading books. I wasn't foolish enough to bring it here, though.

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    Viejo del Foro Just Plain John Wayne's Avatar
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    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    All this talk of rubber tired tractors and Farming... Makes me even more homesick....

    My Uncle had an "ole John Deere M for the gardens it was a one row, built like a Brick Youknowwhathouse.

    He used the Massey's for the acreage he tended, Diesels they were and fun as heck to drive... What work Multiplirers they were.

    Now don't get mad or uppity but the Indians and Spainyards have told me here.

    Una Buena Mula, vale cien negro's

    These are the Campisino's that say this....NOT my words...
    To be called a "Has Been" I must surmise, is much Greater than to be called a "Nevah Been"... JW...



  9. #34
    Junkyard Dog randude's Avatar
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    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    Quote Originally Posted by MizBrown View Post
    Reading about farming in books, though, is really a lot of fun. I know better, yet one of the last books I bought before coming here was one of the John Seymour homesteading books. I wasn't foolish enough to bring it here, though.
    I guess it all depends on what kinds of books you buy and what your attitude is going into reading them.

    I have seen books that really help me in a lot of subjects, but like anything else, there is a lot of horseshit to wade through to get anything good.

    The successful mentor in most crafts has the perfect balance of book-training and on-the-job training.

    I do know that a lot of people have told me things wouldn't work that I headed out to do and they were just wrong. There are people that believe others when they say that something cannot be done, and there are those stubborn few that want to prove them wrong.
    Survivor

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    The Bard of Jinotega MizBrown's Avatar
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    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    Quote Originally Posted by randude View Post
    The successful mentor in most crafts has the perfect balance of book-training and on-the-job training.
    I agree with that, but more books can be sold to dreamers than can be sold to people who actually do things. My uncle took agricultural classes in high school, too. I taught myself to knit from several knitting books, but it took several because each book omitted something that was probably obvious to the writer. Most of those books are written by people who actually knit.

    If I want to raise chickens, I'm going to look at books and articles written by people who really raised them under my conditions, not "back to the lander" books (one of those made some of the stuff up completely. The most famous back to the land book, "Living the Good Life," omitted the detail about the need to have independent sources of income to pull off living off maple syrup and working a couple hours a day.

    Also, if humans invented it, they often write very good books about it. The disconnect often is that reading about something is far easier than actually doing it. Someone said, "Well, the book said tear down a non-bearing wall, and that sentence was awfully easy to read, but tearing down a non-bearing wall just wasn't."

  11. #36
    Active TRN Member vern's Avatar
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    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    i wish i could help you with the driving part but i cannot. except that my brother in law makes the trip every month or so in a 18 wheeler. i can get the route that he takes and give it to you if you want.

    as far as the small engines that you take. well just remember with a little common sence and maybe a utube video they are very simple.

    i locked up my dads husqvarner chainsaw. it was $500 to replace.
    so with a $80 rebuild kit off of ebay and a couple of utube vidoes he now has a stronger and better chainsaw than what he borrowed me. new piston, cylinder, ring and clean chainsaw. now everytime i see him he ask if i want to drive his truck jajja

    anyway i have found out from living in nicaragua that if you have a little common sence and do not mind trying to repair things you can save allot of money.

    seriously with the internet you can repair just about anything. i have replaced engines, transmissions, clutches. i even converted the airconditioner pump on my toyota to a on board air compressor system to pump up tires in case of a flat.

    with the internet you can do allot of things that can be very helpful.
    my little girl

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    Junkyard Dog randude's Avatar
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    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    Quote Originally Posted by vern View Post
    i wish i could help you with the driving part but i cannot. except that my brother in law makes the trip every month or so in a 18 wheeler. i can get the route that he takes and give it to you if you want.

    as far as the small engines that you take. well just remember with a little common sence and maybe a utube video they are very simple.

    i locked up my dads husqvarner chainsaw. it was $500 to replace.
    so with a $80 rebuild kit off of ebay and a couple of utube vidoes he now has a stronger and better chainsaw than what he borrowed me. new piston, cylinder, ring and clean chainsaw. now everytime i see him he ask if i want to drive his truck jajja

    anyway i have found out from living in nicaragua that if you have a little common sence and do not mind trying to repair things you can save allot of money.

    seriously with the internet you can repair just about anything. i have replaced engines, transmissions, clutches. i even converted the airconditioner pump on my toyota to a on board air compressor system to pump up tires in case of a flat.

    with the internet you can do allot of things that can be very helpful.
    That's some good information indeed.

    Isn't the mail a problem down in Nica? I would be worried about actually getting packages there if what they say is true.
    Survivor

  13. #38
    Active TRN Member vern's Avatar
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    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    Yes. Mailing is a problem. If you need parts you must wait till someone can bring them to you or find them in Nicaragua. Also in Nicaragua you will have allot of free time for working and repairing things
    my little girl

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    Viejo del Foro Just Plain John Wayne's Avatar
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    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    Quote Originally Posted by vern View Post
    Yes. Mailing is a problem. If you need parts you must wait till someone can bring them to you or find them in Nicaragua. Also in Nicaragua you will have allot of free time for working and repairing things
    Fabricating things is not a big problem either if you can get thru the communication barrier....
    To be called a "Has Been" I must surmise, is much Greater than to be called a "Nevah Been"... JW...



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    The Bard of Jinotega MizBrown's Avatar
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    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    Quote Originally Posted by randude View Post
    That's some good information indeed.

    Isn't the mail a problem down in Nica? I would be worried about actually getting packages there if what they say is true.

    I haven't had anything go missing that I ordered on line -- books and camera gear. I don't know what it's like in RAAN or RAAS. If you get anything sent USP or FexEx, you have to make the trip to Managua's Customs Warehouse to pick it up, with a side trip to pick up the paperwork from the local USP or FedEx office out in an office complex about a mile or so away.

    Most everything down here is a moving target -- things have improved. I know one guy who says he has more trouble with the USPS than Correos. I've never had any trouble with Correos. (Vern doesn't live here now).

  16. #41

    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    OK flipping a vehicle is official out. The money man decided.

    We are probably still on for a diesel motor that can run a mower, a water pump, and a picador. Like the BCS 722 diesel. I've worked with these a little bit before and they are very sweet. We are planning to build locally a pulley system to run the picador that already sits there.
    http://www.earthtoolsbcs.com/html/walk-behind_tractors.html

    Still haven't figured out shipping. It ships out of KY, so Miami or the gulf I guess. Or really a flight from Memphis to Managua would be better, if it was simple and affordable. We have plenty of time flexibility on our end.

    So do you think FED EX is a smart choice?

  17. #42
    The Bard of Jinotega MizBrown's Avatar
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    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    Quote Originally Posted by benharpo View Post
    OK flipping a vehicle is official out. The money man decided.

    We are probably still on for a diesel motor that can run a mower, a water pump, and a picador. Like the BCS 722 diesel. I've worked with these a little bit before and they are very sweet. We are planning to build locally a pulley system to run the picador that already sits there.
    http://www.earthtoolsbcs.com/html/walk-behind_tractors.html

    Still haven't figured out shipping. It ships out of KY, so Miami or the gulf I guess. Or really a flight from Memphis to Managua would be better, if it was simple and affordable. We have plenty of time flexibility on our end.

    So do you think FED EX is a smart choice?

    Just found out UPS will deliver to street addresses and you need to describe the address Nicaraguan style (find a utility bill for the place) and give them a phone number. If you're way out in the boonies, you might want to make sure they'll deliver there or ask them about pick-up. Check with FedEx on delivery conditions. DHL also ships out of the US (Amazon used them for my Kindle), but may be commercial only leaving the US only. You're going to find that a lot of US-based places know about Managua and nothing much else. Again, everything is a moving target. UPS does appear to be expanding here.

    Almost all flights to Managua go through either Houston or Miami. Check with a straight up air-freight company for that, but I suspect that sea shipment would be cheaper (other people probably know about places that can do that).

  18. #43
    Junkyard Dog randude's Avatar
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    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    Quote Originally Posted by benharpo View Post
    OK flipping a vehicle is official out. The money man decided.

    We are probably still on for a diesel motor that can run a mower, a water pump, and a picador. Like the BCS 722 diesel. I've worked with these a little bit before and they are very sweet. We are planning to build locally a pulley system to run the picador that already sits there.
    http://www.earthtoolsbcs.com/html/walk-behind_tractors.html

    Still haven't figured out shipping. It ships out of KY, so Miami or the gulf I guess. Or really a flight from Memphis to Managua would be better, if it was simple and affordable. We have plenty of time flexibility on our end.

    So do you think FED EX is a smart choice?
    Have you considered using bio diesel? I thought I read about it being developed or plans to the effect of producing it commercially somewhere down there. One of the guys here was talking about some kind of palm being grown for it. I don't imagine that in such an depressed economy getting the stuff for free to make your own, but I could be wrong.

    I used to work for Caterpillar, the electrical and power end of it. I was not here too long, they didn't pay for shit... but it was cool learning about all the different kinds of power take-off options a lot of them had. You could run 4 things off of one diesel engine. I can imagine using one to generate power, charge batteries, and run a host of other useful things. My biggest fear there would be someone swiping it or parts off of it though.
    Survivor

  19. #44
    Viejo del Foro Just Plain John Wayne's Avatar
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    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    Quote Originally Posted by MizBrown View Post
    My uncle wished he'd died on his planting corn just before his 84th birthday. Unfortunately, in his opinion, he lived through the heart attack and can't farm anymore (tied to an oxygen tank). In the day, he ran a 4 foot stone mill off the PTO, and ground malt for moonshiners, flour for his niece, mealy for visiting Africans, and probably ran his sorghum mill off the thing, though that was could have been a different machine. You can get all sorts of attachments for it, or if your neighbors have some and you have others, you can switch work.

    I think my uncle's was also a Ford, but John Deeres are good, too, and the suckers just last and last.
    I was just looking at them yesterday, but for me the gas model is out of the question, I saw a Ford Diesel with all attachments, well 4 or 5 attachments for 3500, and some other nice ones, Massey Furgussion 135C which is a workhorse 35 HP 3PT hitch, PTO 540 NEW TIRES, no equpt.

    But the market is full of that stuff. re-builders are buying cheap, less that 1500 to 500 for old ones. I am thinking as a has been Master Diesel Mech, I could do well in going over one for myself in my new dream to be a Sharecropper.

    Hell even the old Farmall Super A's gasoline 22 HP powered one rows are about the same price as they were 30 years ago now a days. 1000 to 1500 dollars Those old basturds are built to last like an old Wisconson Air cooled. ALL CAST IRON and standard bearings and cogs still available.
    To be called a "Has Been" I must surmise, is much Greater than to be called a "Nevah Been"... JW...



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    Junkyard Dog randude's Avatar
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    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    If you can keep a diesel engine running you would never be poor. Most diesel engines are used to make money.
    Survivor

  21. #46
    Viejo del Foro Just Plain John Wayne's Avatar
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    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    Quote Originally Posted by randude View Post
    If you can keep a diesel engine running you would never be poor. Most diesel engines are used to make money.
    Yes, and they are more effencent than a low compression light duty gas engine. That is why they have to be built heavyier.
    To be called a "Has Been" I must surmise, is much Greater than to be called a "Nevah Been"... JW...



  22. #47

    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    Quote Originally Posted by randude View Post
    If you can keep a diesel engine running you would never be poor. Most diesel engines are used to make money.
    I am in total agreement.

    I think making bio-diesel is an interesting possibility.

    FedEx to Managua would be no problem for us. We can move freight from Managua to the farm on milk trucks.

  23. #48
    Viejo del Foro Just Plain John Wayne's Avatar
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    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    Dietroit Diesel has been making Multi-Fuel injectors for their series 53, 71, and 92 Engines for years.

    One of our members Has a shrimp boat in NC and has burned filtered used peanut/soy oil specialy filtered in his 6-71... I got a laugh when he told me... Only thing is he said is that the exhaust smells just like McDonalds French Fries when using it.

    If it will not gum up the injection system, it will explode with energy when introduced into a hot high pressure combustion chamber.
    To be called a "Has Been" I must surmise, is much Greater than to be called a "Nevah Been"... JW...



  24. #49
    Junkyard Dog randude's Avatar
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    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    Quote Originally Posted by Just Plain John Wayne View Post
    Dietroit Diesel has been making Multi-Fuel injectors for their series 53, 71, and 92 Engines for years.

    One of our members Has a shrimp boat in NC and has burned filtered used peanut/soy oil specialy filtered in his 6-71... I got a laugh when he told me... Only thing is he said is that the exhaust smells just like McDonalds French Fries when using it.

    If it will not gum up the injection system, it will explode with energy when introduced into a hot high pressure combustion chamber.
    One of my buddies, a mechanical engineer that uses bio diesel for his VW told me that diesel was invented to run on peanut oil.
    Survivor

  25. #50
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    Default Re: Driving to Nicaragua, and flipping a car

    Quote Originally Posted by randude View Post
    One of my buddies, a mechanical engineer that uses bio diesel for his VW told me that diesel was invented to run on peanut oil.
    They will just about run on anything, I have even seen a malfunction cause one to start burning it's own lubricant oil. The engine "Ran Away" all goverened mechanical devices lost their control and the engine had a meltdown so to speak. It ran so far above it's rated RPM it flew to pieces. If ever one started and you did not hear the govoner level off at rated speed, people would get the hell outta Dodge, And I am serious.

    So much for my hot rod days of playing around with them underneath a shade tree.

    This is why all Dietriot 2 cycle Diesel engines are equpited with an emergency air shut off, but the engine can only be slowed down with it in a unusal situation, it does not alway's stop one of those builds.
    To be called a "Has Been" I must surmise, is much Greater than to be called a "Nevah Been"... JW...



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    By Mikeh in forum Transportation and Lodging
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    Last Post: 10-03-2008, 06:33 PM

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