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Thread: Bugs in Nicaragua

  1. #1
    Junkyard Dog randude's Avatar
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    Default Bugs in Nicaragua

    Bugs, they are everywhere. It seems that the closer you get to the equator the bigger a lot of things get, bugs included. This fellow named Tacomasteve who lives in Granada posted a picture of what looks like a honey bee on another Nica site. He said it has a wing span of two inches. It made me wonder, are there any other bug stories that someone may want to share?

    For the purpose of this thread, Bugs are just about anything really. Snakes, frogs, sea-creatures, things that get into your skin, whatever. If it is yucky and bothers you talk about it or post a photo here.




    When I was 19-21 I lived in San Diego. At the very bottom of San Diego there is Imperial Beach and I lived there. It is a kind of a dumpy little place as far as San Diego beaches go, but I loved it. You could see the Bull fighting ring in Tiajuana and you could also see helicopters flying constantly.

    One day I was laying on my stomach on Imperial Beach (IB) and felt something biting the back of my, just below my knee. I turned around and seen a big black fly about the size of this bee.

    I jumped up startled. The fly came at me. I hit the fly in the mouth with my fist. The fly went down, and most would have assumed the fly was down for the count. However, the fly came back and with even more energy than before. He had this look n his eyes that I cannot even describe. Obviously that fly was using an ectoskeleton to its advantage, something I do not have by the way. The fly zigged and zagged and came at me. I swung at the fly as it was either him or me. I didn't hold back, I gave it all I had. At some point the fly realized that it had met his match and decided to retreat.

    I looked around and seen a group of young people on a blanket laughing at me. Then I seen that big fly flying in a corkscrew kind of pattern towards their blanket. You never seen four people leave a so fast, and in four different directions. They freaked. They were cowards.

    This really did happen. Summer of 1982, Imperial Beach. And yes, I was very high.
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    Last edited by randude; 09-27-2008 at 07:32 AM.

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    Active TRN Member bikingo's Avatar
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    FYI the Golfo de Fonseca has mosquitos sooo big they're breeding with the local chickens.

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    Junkyard Dog randude's Avatar
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    Hey I know it is a weekend, but no bug stories?

    I was waiting for someone to write, "The roaches are so bad they turn on the light and watch me run around."

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    Fightin Irish JackMcG's Avatar
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    Default Good news about bugs

    My Nica wife is so used to bugs that she doesn't scream or jump up and down or run out of the house when she sees one..... try finding that in a mujer from the USA!... (same thing goes for mice)
    "If you ain't bleeding, you ain't working!"

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    Junkyard Dog randude's Avatar
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    My wife is an American, a native American from Alaska (Tlinglit). When we first moved to SW Louisiana I had to fly into Virginia for a business trip and leave her alone. When she picked me up at the airport on my return she told me that there was a giant bug on our stairs and I was to some how find it and kill it when I got back home. I gave it the ol' college try, but I never seen that bug. She still looks at the stairs really well before heading up.

    Another thing... She likes keeping the porch lights on day and night and I have just gotten used to it, because she will not leave that one alone. I tell her, "Do not fear for yourself if someone ever breaks into our home, fear for them. I don't take that sort of thing lightly." She wants to leave them on though. One night while walking the dog I looked at our brick wall where the fixture is mounted and there were trails of several species of tiny bugs walking all around the light as well as flying insects. We have lizards that come and hang around the door to eat those bugs. It's as though we have created an eco-system by leaving the lights on. If she only knew.
    Last edited by randude; 09-27-2008 at 05:22 PM.

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    Africa: Falaria Flies (result in baby worms swimming through your blood stream and across your eyeballs), malaria, chiggers (small ticks which embedd themselves under your skin and eat away), all sorts of amoebas... (first-hand experience)

    Nicaragua: Mosquitos (dengue), ringworm ... that's all I have first hand experience with...

    Hang on a minute... were you talking about harmless "bugs/insects" which might be scurrying around? Corn Island: big spiders, tarantulas, boa constrictors - most of which will be tortured & killed by locals before you get a chance to see them.

    What is the big deal about insects, anyway?
    That which does not kill me postpones the inevitable

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    Junkyard Dog randude's Avatar
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    Default Marlies

    The truth is I like bugs and think they are interesting. Not too found of some of the other things you mentioned though.

    I just thought this would be a fun thread that people could contribute to.

    Thank you for your contribution.

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    Active TRN Member bikingo's Avatar
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    How about the white lizards that look like clear salamanders that you see on the walls throughout Nicaragua, their called perro-zompopos and they say there poisonous but I dont believe it. I just love saying perro-zomposos.

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    They are Geckos, like in the "Geico" commercial. Same as you see in Florida.
    That which does not kill me postpones the inevitable

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    Fightin Irish JackMcG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikingo View Post
    How about the white lizards that look like clear salamanders that you see on the walls throughout Nicaragua, their called perro-zompopos and they say there poisonous but I dont believe it. I just love saying perro-zomposos.

    The Missus says only the dark perro-zompopos are poisonous, especially with a square shaped tail.....
    I used to hear them fall off the ceiling sometimes onto the tile floor of our house in Granada... they would make a loud smack sound, be knocked out for a bit and then get up and run off...
    They eat a ton of mosquitos so are great to have around... (the light colored ones)
    "If you ain't bleeding, you ain't working!"

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    Free Thinker nutbutter's Avatar
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    Free Thinker nutbutter's Avatar
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    Default Check this monster....

    http://www.nicaliving.com/node/13322
    I have an open kitchen with attached garden and it seems that the kitchen geckos are the tan almost transparent guys while the garden lizards are generally smaller and much darker, almost black... I don't think they are poisonous...the cats eat the black ones ups up like whiskas

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    One of the darker colored lizards bit my daughter when she was sitting on a chair next to the wall. Looked like it gave her a good pinch.

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    Junkyard Dog randude's Avatar
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    Default Cats

    Cats are a great thing to have around. They are better at keeping the small intruders at bay while the dog just barks at the mail man. No wonder most women are cat people. I like cats too, but I don't have one. They don't travel as well as a small dog.

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by randude View Post
    Cats are a great thing to have around. They are better at keeping the small intruders at bay while the dog just barks at the mail man. No wonder most women are cat people. I like cats too, but I don't have one. They don't travel as well as a small dog.
    Our neighbors have some cats, so they jump over our division walls and eat all the critters. I have caught our wild chicken eating one of those lizards too.

  16. #16
    Junkyard Dog randude's Avatar
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    I had a cat when I was married to my first wife that she called Sly (Sly Guy).

    Sly was an odd cat. He was sick when he was unexpectantly born in my spare bedroom closet (someone gave us a pregnant cat, a different story there). We had all of these new kittens, but the black and white one that looked like the cartoon character didn't walk right. He dragged his hind quarters as though his rear half didn't work. I was in college at the time, and my first wife was just my girl friend that was living with me, and we had no money at all. We took Sly to the vet and the doctor asked us if we had an appointment. I just said no, it was an emergency. I think he could tell by the way I said emergency and maybe the looks of us that we didn't have any money. He gave us some pink pills and said that 50% chance they work and the other 50% meant he would die. Black and white, just like the cat. He told us he probably had a virus and the keep him away from the other kittens. That meant that this new baby cat had to be fed by us and sleep with us. Sly did live instead of die. At such a young age Sly really bonded with us as his parents.

    He was just odd. One of his many, daily, regular habits, would be to Cry (Meow). We would try to make cat sounds and meow back. This would go on back and forth for a long time. Usually one of the humans would give up first.

    Anyway, what was really strange about Sly was that he could catch a fly in mid-air. We would see him cry (meow) when the flys were too high. He would run around really fast jumping on tables and book shelves to get the reach. When they got within Sly's reach he would reach up and grab one out of the air (He had an incredible jump, even for a cat) Then he would eat it. You would hear a crunching sound as he munched down on it. I started to call him Fly Guy.

    Fly guy lived a long and healthy life, but eventually died of what my wife termed, "Female AIDS".

    We had plenty of cats for that entire marriage and I usually complained about them ruining very expensive furniture or the smell of their litter box, but I still remember some of the fun reasons people do have cats.
    Last edited by randude; 09-29-2008 at 12:25 PM.

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    Junkyard Dog randude's Avatar
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    Default Here is a bug story by a tourist on Little Corn

    Read Megan's travelogue from the beginning... Little Corn Island, Nicaragua - Here At Last (Part II)

    Wednesday, February 15, 2006

    We couldn't find the toilet. There was not one light in the entire compound. We searched and searched among the trees, but didn't see it. Hmm. That was not so great. (Because some things can't just be done behind a tree.) We went back to the room. Even though it was only around 7:30 p.m. it would have been nice to go to sleep, but we didn't have our mosquito net yet and would have to wait for them to get home from the birthday party so we could get it. Ramon didn't think there was much threat from mosquitos with the strong ocean wind coming in, but I was worried about bugs in general.

    And it turned out that we had good reason for worry. First we discovered the flock of large cockroaches scurrying to and fro on the organicly-formed nightstand-thingy next to the bed. Look, we live in New York City. We're no stranger to the cockroach. But these were the big kind, the thumb-sized ones. And they didn't run from the light as I'm used to roaches doing. Run, roaches! It's light, your enemy!

    To read the whole story:

    http://www.meganlyles.com/little-cor...t-last-part-ii
    Survivor

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